1867


At the Conference held in London, in November, 1866, were the result of careful and earnest deliberation, and are so plain that any preliminary observations may appear superfluous; a brief summary of their import, with a few remarks on the nature of the Society itself, may not, however, be out of place


AMALGAMATION

In 1867 a scheme for the amalgamation of the Brighton Railway with the South Eastern was debated with much acrimony and ultimately rejected by the former companyshareholders. 

After fifty-six years this fusion became a fact in 1923.


Dorking Locomotive Shed opened in 1867


BRIGHTON DRIVERS STRIKE

TUESDAY 26th MARCH 1867

It was the locomotive drivers and firemen who had the industrial muscle, though, and it was not long before a strike by 400 men of the London, Brighton & South Coast Railway became the first to result in train services being disrupted. They downed tools in March 1867 over their meagre daily pay, which was just 7s 6d for a driver and 4s 6d for a fireman. The company’s attempt to recruit replacements failed and virtually all its services were stopped, including the lucrative race trains for the first spring meeting at Epsom.




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The engraving at Balcombe in October 2011.


Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


from http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk



Ford Arun Bridge 4th May 1867 

no mention of Enginemen 

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London Bridge 7th May 1867 

no mention of Enginemen 

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THE LOCO WITH A MIND OF IT'S OWN

On the 29th May, 1867 when Driver Marley (New Cross?) was unable to close the regulator of a 'Craven Standard Passenger 2-4-0 loco' No. 185  as it run into Brighton station with the 8.0 a.m. down express. Despite a full application of the tender brake, and assistance from the guard, the speed could not be reduced below 20 to 25 m.p.h. Fortunately, this train was booked to call at the ticket platform before running on to the terminus, which gave just sufficient time and distance for both crew members to force the regulator closed, and then reverse the engine and apply steam. The buffers were hit, but only at a walking pace and no serious injuries were suffered. Subsequently the driver, fireman and guards were fined for ‘running into the Brighton ticket platform dangerously and at too high a speed’, the regulator on No. 185 having been found in good order.

Driver Marley, however was not satisfied, and found on other occasions that the regulator failed to close completely as well as at times opening slightly on its own. Complaining of this eccentricity, he was not believed and no thorough investigation was made until there came the day when No.185 had to be moved on New Cross shed by the Staff. The regulator opened with ease and then stuck. Moving quite smartly the engine bumped into a line of coke wagons and propelled them towards the foremen’s office, from whence this gentleman appeared at high speed, warned by much shouting that all was not well. He just managed to leap clear before the coke wagons and the gently puffing loco enveloped the area. Halted by the debris, the culprit’s regulator was closed. The offending item was removed forthwith, and since nothing could still be found amiss a new one was fitted with apparent success, since no further mentioned appears in the accident reports. One hopes that those fined received a full pardon and their money back. 

Ducks (and Drakes) of Directors 

WW, artist, and Dalziel, engraver. Fun 5 (29 June 1867): 167. 

Text beneath caption: Chorus (Air:— “That’s the way the money goes”): — “Fling away, boys! Lots more where that came from!” W.W., artist. Dalziel, engraver. Source: Hathi Digital Library Trust web version of a copy in the University of Minnesota library. Click on image to enlarge it.

A blindfolded John Bull, symbol of England, holds a sack of money from which the directors of railway boards take and hurl away coins as a locomotive marked “Inquiry” arrives

Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


from http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk



London Victoria 5th October 1867 

no mention of Enginemen 

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Streatham Common 3rd December 1867 

no mention of Enginemen 

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