1887


BATTERSEA & LONGHEDGE BRANCH 

OF A.S.L.E.&F. OPENS

In 1887 the Executive Committee decided to replace the branch password and replace it with a Society Emblem and invited designs for a Society Emblem, and "that the first engineman and fireman be shown on this emblem, subject to their approval."

Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


from http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk



Glynde 4th January 1887 

Involving Brighton Driver Henry Harland, Fireman unknown 

SEE SUB PAGE


London Bridge 27th Jan. 1887 

Involving Driver Charles Churchill & Fireman Henry Cooper, Depot 

unknown 

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Blue Anchor 27th January 1887 

Involving Driver George Sergeant & Fireman George Brown & 

Driver George Norris Arthur Holter both depots unknown 

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Newhaven Town (N) 1847-1887 

The shed was to close in 1887 with the opening of the new shed opening at Newhaven 

Town.



 PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

Newhaven Loco Shed



Newhaven Town (N) 1887-1963 

The second Newhaven shed was located on the West side of Newhaven Town. The shed was 
constructed by corrugated iron (the shed was re-roofed (pre 1950s) with corrugated asbestos and corrugated asbestos gables), it had a four track straight dead-ended shed with a pitched style corrugated iron roof. The facilities at the shed were to include a turntable (enlarged to 60ft in 1917), a coal stage and a water column.

Newhaven shed was a sub-depot of the Brighton shed. Newhaven shed and depot closed on 
the 9th September 1963. 

The shed was in private use and was demolished in September 2014.

 



BRAMLEY LOCOMOTIVE SHED


The Bramely Loco shed closed in 1887, by the L.B.S.C.R.

In  1887 London South Western Railway Motive Power Depot and its predecessor housed London, Brighton & South Coast Railway engines after nearby Bramley shed blew down in an 1887 gale. For example Terriers Nos 36 Bramley and 77 Wonersh, at first and class C 0-6-0 No. 420 from 1890s. All carried  Guildford shed code, but returned to Horsham at weekends, for maintenance. This carried on until the Grouping when it ceased of course.


INFORMATION FROM

ANTONY HERMAN

THE FORMATION OF THE 


BATTERSEA & LONGHEDGE BRANCH


The first Branch of A.S.L.E.F. to be founded on the Brighton Line, was at Battersea & 

Longhedge in 1887, it later changed it’s name to the Battersea Nos. 1 & 2 Branches, and 

then it finally became the Battersea Branch. It was not a Depot Branch, but a Branch that 

covered the whole of the South London with a membership from depots of all the old 

companies (L.B.S.C.R., L.S.W.R., L.S.E.R. & L.C.D.R.)

This was quite a common practice for a Branch to opened at one location and it members 
being located at other depots within their area, such was the case with the opening of the 
Horsham Branch in 1898, with it’s members being based at Littlehampton and Midhurst (and probably with some members at Three Bridges) depots. 

The Battersea Branch was also responsible for the setting up of a number of Depot Branches 
such as the Nine Elms Branch. It is also known, that members from Battersea Branch were 
present at the opening of the Newhaven Branch in 1912 and Seaford Branch in 1935, and this was probably mirrored previously at the setting up of other Branches through out the 
Brighton Railway, whereby members from nearby Branches would go along support their 
fellow in Enginemen in the opening of their own Branch of A.S.L.E.& F.

The Battersea Branch was also responsible for setting up a Supervisors Branch, as the 
Supervisory grades were made up of Enginemen being promoted from the Enginemen grades.


Victoria Motormans depot opened on the 17th June 1928 

and Streatham Hill Motormans depot opened in 1936



PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL

extracted from RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR


On the 11th March, 1887 when engine No.312 “Albion” was standing under the coal tips on Battersea shed at 10.40 p.m. it had just worked an empty troop special up from Portsmouth and was being coaled in preparation for an early morning cattle train to Lewes when it run into by seven ash wagons propelled by “D- Tank” No.351 ‘Chailey’and crushed against a Craven goods. At the time the driver was oiling the motion, but by some lucky chance was flung clear and escaped injury, while the fireman who was having his supper in the rest room and therefore out of harm’s way, fell in his hurry to reach the scene and broke is collar bone.

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL

extracted from RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR


On 10th August, 1887 Belgravia Class, No 205 'Kensington' was in charge of the 3.22 p.m. Victoria to Hastings express, when Fireman William Ellis joined the train surreptitiously while passing over Grosvenor Bridge. This was on his way home, and as Clapham Junction was reached he stopped the train by using the electric communication bell. Jumping clear as the speed fell he would have identification if it had not been for the dog which always accompanied Driver Morgan on'Kensington's' footplate. Sent after the stowaway, he caught Ellis near the line side fence and held him until the police arrived.


THE DYKE  BRANCH

1887 - 1932

On the 1st September 1887 the Dyke branch was opened, with the first train comprising of 
seven coaches and a guard’s van, left Brighton at 8.00 a.m. and was hauled by a Terrier Tank 
0-6-0T No.41 Piccadilly.

On the August Bank Holiday of 1893 the Devil’s Dyke saw around 30,000 people 
flocking to the Dyke, with many of them being brought by train.

A Push - Pull workings was introduced in 1905.

The line continued until 1917 in midst of the First Word War as economy measures. The 
service recommenced on 26th July 1920.

The Southern Railway purchased a Sentinel Cammel Steam Railcar in 1932 for use on the 
Dyke Branch. Although operational successful, the single railcar and was not large enough to meet the needs of the branch line. 

The railcar was transferred away in March 1936. and was tried to other area parts of the Southern Railway and was finally withdrawn in 1940.

The Dyke Branch line closed on the 1st January 1939.


Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


from http://www.railwaysarchive.co.uk



Kensington 11th October 1887 

Involving Driver Gibbs & Fireman Amos Smith, Depot unknown 

SEE SUB PAGE


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