1913


Passage of new Trade Union Act. 

Arising from pressure by the Society


Enginemen given exclusive option for electric motormen’s positions 

(on L.S.W.R. first, later on other lines affected).


The formation of National Union of Railwaymen 

THE CANCELLATION OF ELECTRIFICATION 

TO COULSDON AND CHEAM

In January 1913 the L.B.S.C.R. announced the decision to equip the whole of its suburban railways as far as Coulsdon (North) and Cheam. The work was expected to be completed in four years, but with section opened for electric traction as finished. The principle lines involved were 

London Bridge to New Cross, Norwood Junction, East Croydon, and Coulsdon.  

Balham to Selhurst.

Norwood Junction to West Croydon, Wallington, Sutton and Cheam. 

Tulles Hill to Mitcham Junction and Sutton.

This was also to include various spurs lines to include Sydenham to Crystal Palace and Old Kent Road to New Cross (Gate). The Old Kent Road to New Cross never carried a regular passenger service.

The first section was Balham to Wallington via Selhurst and West Croydon. In April 1914, it expected to be opened in the summer of 1915, but, with the outbreak of the First World War, it became necessary to cancel the main contracts.  Some portion of the work was continued during the war and the intermediate post war periods.

 Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.



Crystal Palace 2nd February 1913

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


Extracted and adapted from 

A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


JANUARY 1913


page 15


On arriving on Monday morning I found awaiting me a request to attend a delegate meeting of London, Brighton & South Coast Railway locomotivemen, at Brighton, I attended to this and found these men had been successful in obtaining some slight improvements in their conditions of service at the hands of the directors, but there was still one or two matters left over to be dealt with by and through the locomotive superintendent. Various matters were discussed and arrangements made for future action with an open door.

On the Sunday I attended a meetings of our New Cross Branch, called for the-purpose of discussing and clearing up some misunderstandings that had crept in and were making themselves felt in the shape of a few backsliders. I am pleased to say that after some straight and plain talk, what had appeared as mountains, became simple molehills, and in the end most of those present deter- mined to again stand to their guns and do what they could to build up their own Society.


LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


FEBRUARY 1913


Extracted and adapted from 

A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

report on his visit to the Newhaven Branch meeting, 

on Sunday, 1st December, 1912

page 64

The following morning, Sunday 1st December 1912, I was a stir be times in order to leave for Newhaven, where an open meeting was called in the afternoon to hear reports from two 
delegates, who, with others, had waited on the directors of the London, Brighton and South 
Coast Railway. The concessions granted compare favourably with what have been granted by other companies, but the question is : what have we to compare with ? On the strength of the promise by the Government after August, 1911, that they would be allowed to recoup 
themselves from the pockets of the public for concessions granted, the railway companies 
have doled out a few meagre improvements, amounting in some instances to one shilling per 
week, or two pence per day—just on a par with what any shopkeeper would think of offering his errand boy—an insult to a body of men like the footplate and motormen of this country. 

Then each railway company has been very careful not to out-do the others in these 
extravagant concessions, or do anything which could in any way be construed into a 
precedent, at the same time taking care to so jumble up conditions, wages, &c, that no two 
companies' men are receiving anything like the same remuneration for the same services 
performed. Of course, the astute official knows this gives him a fine trump card up his sleeve, so to speak, and while the men are content to approach them as .particular companies they can always ring the changes on that card by asking the very innocent question: "What other company's men are there that are better paid than you are ? " But to come back to the 
Newhaven meeting. I took the chair, and the delegates gave their report, which, as before 
said, was satisfactory by comparison. But there was one or two present who soon made it 
clear by their questions that with them it was not a question of whether the new conditions 
were satisfactory or not; they were present to show their disapproval of the manner in which 
they had been obtained, viz., by and through members of the Associated Society. Needless to say, these were the men who had pinned their faith to an all-grade society. As chairman, I did not attempt to stifle discussion, but allowed all the latitude possible, using both argument and diplomacy to try and get at the why and wherefore. But I found these men at Newhaven were not a bit more intelligent on these matters than others I have met; and so I failed to get anything more from them than the fact that they couldn't leave the shed unless the signalman turned the points, and they couldn't shunt the train unless there was a shunter present. I have been wondering ever since what that had to do with the concessions and the way they were obtained. 

However, I am pleased to say there are only one or two at Newhaven whose education has 
been neglected, and I hope the little branch I have opened there will soon bring them up-to-
date.

  PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

NEWHAVEN MARINE STATION

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 1913

BATTERSEA BRANCH

PAGE 76

In connection with the above branch a dinner was held on January 9th, at the Queen Hotel, Robertson Street, to commemorate the concessions granted by the board of directors on October 16th last. Every credit is due %o our host for the excellent spread he put before us, and which, like we sometimes are ourselves, was ready up to time. The green flag having been waved, all present at once commenced to satisfy themselves. This being done, we all settled down to enjoy a musical evening. This was provided by the following artistes:—Messrs. G. Marmell, C. Lloyd, F. Atkinson, T. Harrison, A. Gallard, W. Potter, B. Smith, C. Friend, A. Pointer, W. Suckling, W. Sadler, W. Kitchingman, J. Satchwell, W. Baldwin, and " Fighting Mac," otherwise known as the "Clapham Giant," while one of our brethren from Slades Green, D. Hocking, also assisted. During the evening reports were given by the chairman of the deputation, Brother A. E. Harrison, and Brother J. Cordrey, delegate, which were much appreciated. The toast of the A.S.L.E. & F. was also proposed by our old friend, Brother J. Bliss, or, as he is sometimes called, the " Battersea Bishop," and seconded by Brother Warwick, organizing secretary. We had with us two of the delegates from Brighton, one of whom has done good work as corresponding secretary. At the close a hearty vote of thanks was given to them and likewise to our host. Will our members please note that our meetings are held every Friday at the Queen Hotel, Robertson Street, Battersea, and we hope ere long to again have a few evening similar to the above. Wishing one and all a Prosperous New Year, more concessions, and hoping to see the tail end bein put on our week’s holiday in 1913 is the wish of

ONLY A BOY

 

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 1913

ST. LEONARD'S BRANCH

PAGE 71


A special meeting was held at the Oddfellow’s Arms, on Sunday, December 15th, for the purpose of having a full report of the interviews which our delegates had with our locomotive engineer, Mr. L. Billinton, and board of directors. Brothers Enves, Brighton, and A. Marshall, Eastbourne, gave a full report of all correspondence that had passed and the concessions that were granted. Questions were asked and answered, after which a vote of thanks was passed to the speakers, on the proposition of Brother Croucher, seconded by Brother Nince.

Branch Secretary

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

FEBRUARY 1913

HORSHAM BRANCH

page 73

It is some long while since anything appeared in the Journal under this heading. Nevertheless we have been doing our little bit towards increasing our membership and extending our society. On Sunday December 1st, several of our members journeyed to Three Bridges, and with the help of one or two members who are stationed there, and Brother Harrison, of Battersea, a meeting was held for the purpose of hearing the report of the meeting of the board of directors and the representatives of the locomotive-men of the Brighton Railway. Brother W. H. Worcester was voted in the chair, and he asked Brother Harrison to give his report,which he did in a very intelligible manner. the chairman was then called upon to say a few words, but there was not very much left for him to say as Brother Harrison had given us a very full report. Questions were then invited. Though the attendance was not so large as one might have expected, considering the purpose of the meeting, it was very attentive and appreciated what was said. I might say that some of our A.S.R.S. friends were  present one of whom asked several questions (to clear the atmosphere a little) which were answered to his satisfaction. several other questions were asked and answered; and Brother Meadhurst, in a few well-chosen words, thanked us for coming. The usual votes of thanks being given, the meeting was brought to a close.

 --------------

A meeting was held the same afternoon, this being called by an A.S.R.S. member. who appears to have a good deal of influence on the men. This was very well attended, and Brothers Harrison and Worcester made it their business to be present. They also gave a report, and succeeded in getting the following resolution, which was moved by J. Neeve and seconded by W. Packham, both A.R.S.R. member, carried unanimously:-

"That the Three Bridges locomotive-men accept the concessions granted by the board of directors"

I think this is a very good work, considering (as I understand) that this meeting was held in opposition to ours in the morning.

At the ordinary meeting of the above branch, held on December 15th and before a fair attendance, a presentation was made to Brothers J. Worcester and J. Payne of an umbrella and a pipe. Brother P. Manvell, in making the presentation, said that all members in the western district were aware that our two brothers had taken a prominent part in connection with the branch in obtaining concessions and better conditions of service. He went on to say that the business their two delegates had carried on requested grit, courage, and self sacrifice, and that it reflected great credit on them for what they had assisted to accomplish for their comrades, and he was pleased the members had realized to the fullest extent what they had done. He said he had great pleasure, on behalf of the members, of showing that their valuable work was not forgotten and he hoped they would accept these presents, not so much for their intrinsic worth, as that they were a token of the appreciation of all the locomotive-men in the Horsham district. The umbrella, he hoped, would not only serve to shelter them in rough weather, but also from the storms they may have to encounter while doing their duty for their fellow men. A notable feature of the presentation was that the A.S.R.S. members also contributed, a proof of the amity existing in recognition of the good work. Brother J. Worcester said, in recording his thanks, that he was pleased he had given them satisfaction with no thought of anything of that kind; he had only tried to do his best, and was glad it met with their approbation. Brother J. Payne, in replying, said it was one of the greatest surprises in his life. What he had done was a labour of love; which was only what a man should do if possessed the ability and qualifications. He recognized the importance and the responsibility resting on locomotive-men, and considered in the interest of the Society, its members, and the companies, it was essential to hold counsel together, because it was the only means which tended to successful working. He thanked them all most kindly for the gift. Brother W. Buckham, our late secretary, was heartily thanked for the work he had done in connection with the presentation; always a characteristic feature with him in doing a kindness to all.

BRANCH SECRETARY

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

FEBRUARY 1913

EASTBOURNE BRANCH

PAGE 81

 

At the first meeting this year of the above branch, we had the pleasure of presenting a framed emblem to Brother C. Broomfield, who has held the chairmanship of our branch for the last three years. In responding, Brother Broomfield thanked the members very much, and among other things said he hoped they would give the new chairman the same support as had been given to him.

Events in the south are very rare, but we note with pleasure the number of new branches that 
are opened up and down the country, and can't help but think that there is a bright future 
before the locomotive-men of this country.  


BRANCH SECRETARY

 

  PHIL PLAINE COLLECTION 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


Extracted and adapted from 

A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


MARCH 1913


page 117


The following day I attended the annual dinner of our Battersea Branch. Our old and esteemed friend, Brother J. Bliss, occupied the chair, and a few friends from other branches were present. After dinner the evening was spent in harmony and the usual speeches. The chairman moved the toast of the evening : " The Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen," and your humble replied. Brother Stevenson, E.C. member for the district, had promised to be present, but on that date had been summoned, with the rest of the Executive Committee, to the north, to deal with the famous Driver Knox case. 

The next evening I attended our Battersea Branch meeting with the same object in view, while several matters of interest were discussed and dealt with. This brought us up to within a day of two of Christmas, which was the quietest, from a Society standpoint, that it has been my lot to experience. 

 Dates of initial Passenger Service DC operation (4th rail system) 


EAST LONDON LINE


East London Line Monday 31st March 1913 (New Cross (Gate) - Shoreditch) worked by the Metropolitan Railway. The Great Eastern Railway continued to operated a freight inter-change service to New Cross (Gate).

This was cause more displacement amongst New Cross Enginemen, with their passenger work being done by the Motormen grade of drivers. 


LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 


APRIL1913

 

 

BRIGHTON BRANCH


page 182


The members of the above held their second annual dinner at the Springfield Hotel, Brightonon Saturday, February 15th, Brother H. Funnell, chairman of the branch, being in the chair. Every credit is due to our host for the excellent spread, which all present thoroughly enjoyed. 

The usual toasts were proposed: "The King" by the chairman, The LondonBrighton and 
South Coast Railway," by Brother Payne, of Horsham, "The A.S.L.E. & F.," by our E.C. 
member, Mr Stevenson, and seconded by the branch secretary. It was pointed out that the the 
branch came of age on *August 21st 1891. An excellent list of songs was given  by the 
members, as well as an especially good turn by our wizard, Brother G. Dance. Apologies 
were received from Mr. Warwick and the LondonBrighton and South Coast Railway 
delegates, who were unavoidably absent. As our E. C. member had to leave to catch his train, Brother Payne was invited to present Brother T. Hatcher with the Executive Committeemedallion for proposing seventy-two new members during 1912. Brother T. Hatcher suitably responded, and trusted that every endeavour would be made to enable Brother H. Funnell to be presented with a medallion at the next annual dinner.

 

BRANCH SECRETARY

  

*25th August 1891

 


 

 PHIL PLAINE COLLECTION 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


APRIL 1913


BRIGHTON BRANCH


page 190

 
Sir - It is with deep regret that I inform your readers of the death of one of our cleaner 
members, Brother F. Lower, who passed away at the Sussex County Hospital on January 
29th last. His death was the result of being crushed between two engines in the running shed. 

The interment took place at the Preston Cemetery, when a large number of his fellow 
enginemen attended. The outdoor locomotive superintendent was represent while the shed 
foreman was present. a beautiful artificial wreath was sent from the members of the branch. 
Our deepest sympathy is with the mother and family. 

BRANCH SECRETARY 

 * W. Warwick's report below

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

APRIL 1913

page 162


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F Organising Secretary W.Warwick’s report


 

The next day (Thursday 30th January) I was called to Brighton to attend an inquest on one of our cleaner members (Bro F. Lower) who had met with a fatal accident in the  locomotive shed at that place In this case no one saw exactly how it occurred, but it was conjectured that he had attempted to do a good turn in assisting to couple up a tender, and had got pinched. 
The verdict was “accidental death" A distressing feature of the case was the fact that our 
brother was to some extent the support of his mother, while a redeeming feature was the fact 
that he was a  member of our Society, and the matter for compensation for the mother was at 
once placed in the hands of a solicitor, who is carrying it through on her behalf.

On returning home I visited our Battersea Branch secretary, and afterwards journeyed to Crystal Palace Station in connection with a mishap which occurred there on the previous Sunday, and in which a member of our Battersea Branch was concerned.

The same day I should have been at Brighton, attending a delegate meeting, but owing to the above was unable to full fill that engagement. The next day I visited Battersea on important business.

The following day (Monday 10th February) I attended at London Bridge with the London, 
Brighton, and South Coast Railway delegation, which was seeking an interview with the 
general manager re an important matter affecting the whole of the firemen on that line ; the 
whole matter turned out very satisfactorily, an interview being granted to your humble as 
well as the delegation In the end, an order which had been issued increasing the work and 
responsibility of the firemen was withdrawn. 

The same evening I attended an open meeting at Battersea, at which reports were given and an address by myself. The next day I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at Wimbledon, and also a delegate meeting at Brighton.

The next day I attended a Board of Trade inquiry held by Colonel Von Donop, at Crystal Palace Station, re the matter mentioned above, as affecting a member of our Battersea Branch, but I realize my space is more than full for this month, an address by myself.

The next day (Tuesday 11th February) I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at Wimbledon, and also a delegate meeting at Brighton. The inquiry was as to the cause of injury to a shunter In this case again our men came out without blame. which has been one of the busiest, and so further comment must stand over for our next. 

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

APRIL 1913

PAGE 185


BATTERSEA BRANCH

Sir, - Brother F. North wishes me to thank the members of the Benevolent Fund for the sum of £38 which he has received, and hopes the members of our Society who do not belong to this Fund will see their way clear to join as soon as possible, for none know whose turn it will be next to meet with misfortune.

A.E. HARRISON

BRANCH SECRETARY. 

DOUGLAS D'ENNO COLLECTION
New Cross Middle and New Loco Sheds

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

APRIL 1913

NEW CROSS BRANCH

page 271

An open meeting of the above branch was held on Sunday, April 27th, when electric train driving, that all important question to locomotive-men, was dealt with. The correspondence up to date was read, while a report of the interviews which  have taken place was given by our delegate, Brother G. Pullen. There was a large amount of correspondence, which took one hour and a quarter to read. One or two members of the N.U.R. “Never United Railwaymen" is, I know, the wrong interpretation of those letters, but personally I don't think it is were present, and by the questions they asked the delegate, it was plainly seen that they were there to stir up party feeling, which I am pleased to say has never been entertained in this branch on this subject, that is: " Electrification as it affects Locomotive-men." One question from a N.U.R. man was to ask whom the deputation consisted of, and the reply he got was:  That it consisted of men capable of looking after his interests," which' he could not deny, and after a receiving such truthful and honest replies as that, these few who are in the wrong society soon appeared to get a bit more Tight-minded in the way of thinking. There were a few young firemen in the room, some of whom asked for proposal forms. I am pleased to say that we have been asked for a good number of these forms already this year, which goes to show that we are once again looking upwards. At present I don't think there is any other system where this electrification affects the locomotive-men the same as it does at New Cross. I say at present, because I am convinced that a few years hence it will become more generally adopted. I trust that the men on other lines will take the advice Brother J. Membery gave when he paid us a visit from West Brompton a short time ago. It was to the effect that the front of those "trains should be the place of a locomotiveman, and that we were fools if we stood by, with our guns loaded and afraid to fire, and see those men, whom they want us to call brothers, take the job away from us, thus depriving us of our living. But after hearing from our delegate the strenuous efforts the deputation is making on our behalf, the locomotive-men here have unanimously decided to support any action-its members choose to take. I hope the locomotive-men of the country will soon realize that they must mind their own business and trust their affairs in the hands of men capable of looking after their interests.

ASSISTANT SECRETARY. 

NEW TERMS AND CONDITIONS FOR


DRIVERS, FIREMEN & CLEANERS

Extracted and adapted from the book

Lawson Billinton: A Career Cut Short

By Klaus Marx 


On the 7th May, 1913 there was a meeting between the Chairman, General Manager, 
Locomotive Engineer and drivers Jack Enves (Brighton ) and G.R. Pullen (New Cross) 
and fireman Albert Harrison (Battersea) regarding the interpretation of the agreement of the 16th October 1912. The following month it was agreed representatives of firelighters and washer-out should sit on the Conciliation Board, and the first election were confirmed at the start of November.

In June 1913, in view of a concession already made by other companies, it was ordered 
that, from and after the issue of new clothes in November,


'the men to whom the issue is made be not require to return the uniform clothes then in 

their possession except the badges thereon and the uniform caps, but that men who leave 

the service shall return forthwith the uniform clothes and caps then in use.'


On the 28 October 1913 Billinton met with representatives of the skilled and unskilled 
section of the workforce. The general request was for a rise; there had been no increase in 
20 odd years, Billinton was willing to agree,

'to a certain extent that the cost of living has increased, but a material increase in the 

money in your pockets has been brought about through piecework, a 25 per cent 

increase between 1891 and 1913. 

When you review theses facts you will see that you have already have what you have 

asked for. Except for 'London Rates' we are higher than any other railway in England.


The deputation looked upon the cost of living in Brighton as being equally as high as in 
London. Billinton's response was that the Unions decided some years ago that the London 
Rates should be higher than in other places.

 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


MAY 1913


page 218


Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 


Organising Secretary W. Warwick’s report


Immediately following the Board of Trade inquiry at the Crystal Palace Station, our member concerned was discharged by the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway, but the matter was at once taken in hand by petition for his reinstatement. 

On the Saturday (15th February) I received a wire asking me to attend an inquest at West Worthing, near Brighton. On arriving at that place I found it was being held at Goring-on-Sea, a station further on; however, I managed to get there, and found it to be a case where a member of our Brighton Branch had, unfortunately, run over a young man at an occupation crossing ; it was a somewhat mysterious case, and after going throughly into the evidence produced the jury returned a verdict of suicide.

The following day (Wednesday 19th February) I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at 
Brighton re a fatal accident to one of our cleaner members mentioned in my last report; Mr. 
Main conducted the same, and although he could attach no blame to the men concerned, he 
was not quite satisfied that the instructions for shed shunting had been properly carried out. 
Here let me again call the attention of our members to the fact that these instructions are, or 
should be posted in every shed, and are very explicit; also that the Board of Trade is very 
particular as to the carding out of same, and therefore our men would be well advised to 
carry them out to the letter, regardless of the time taken, as it is to these instructions the 
officials and the Board of Trade Inspectors refer when anything occurs. 

The next day I attended a delegate meeting at Brighton re the electrification and other business. The following day I was occupied at the desk, while the next day I attended at Battersea re important Society matters. On the Saturday I again visited Battersea, and on Sunday (2nd March) visited Brighton with a view to attending the branch meeting, where some important business was transacted. During the week I attended at London Bridge to assist the locomotive delegation of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway. 

During the same week (weekend Sat 22.3.13) I visited London Bridge and New Cross for the purpose of making inquiries re an accident at the locomotive shed at Brighton.

AN OPEN MEETING AT OF  LITTLEHAMPTON 
 
on Sunday 4th May 1913

See W. Warwick’s report below

The Horsham A.S.L.E.&F. branch reported in the Locomotive Journal, October 1911, that at a opening branch meeting took place at Horsham, on September 12th 1911, and members from Littlehampton were in attendance



THE OPENING OF 

THE THREE BRIDGES BRANCH


17th MAY 1913

Prior to the opening of the Three Bridges Branch of A.S.L.E.& F., 
Three Bridges members were formerly members of the Tunbridge Wells Branch 

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

MAY 1913

EASTBOURNE BRANCH

page 227


On Good Friday our annual super and concert took place, when sixty-five members and their wives sat down and enjoyed themselves. There was also about a dozen members from the St. Leonards branch, who came to share with us the sport and good things provided by the wives of Brothers H. Rogers, A. Marshall and Geo. Hall. In the afternoon we held our annual cricket match, when Brother Niner's eleven, which suffered defeat by a few runs, played our team, and we wish them better luck next time. The match was played in very bad weather, but we all agreed to go through with it, seeing that we have to work in all sorts of weather. After supper, to which all did ample justice, we had a splendid concert, while one pleasing feature was a presentation of a marble clock to our secretary, Brother A. Marshall, in appreciation of the good work which he has done towards helping to better the conditions of our fellow members. Brother H. Rogers, being in the chair, made the presentation, and on behalf of the brothers wished him good luck in his future work for the Society. Brother A. Marshall said he was surprised, but thanked all the members for the handsome present and said he should value it as a mark of confidence and appreciation of his humble services. He had always endeavored to better the lot of the footplate-men, being of the opinion that as our earning capacity had increased our wages should increased correspondingly. He said that was not the case, although we have received a few concessions which compare favourably with those given by other companies; but as the cost of living is growing at such a great rate wages will have to be speeded up to keep pace with it. We are all pleased with the progress our Society is making, seeing that we have now nearly 27,000 members, while new branches are opened all over the country. He said that enginemen are beginning to realize that there is only one Society for them. He was very pleased to see so many of our members from St. Leonards Branch, and also the good feeling that existed between both branches, and hoped they would come over as often as possible. He also congratulated Brother Niner on his receipt of the Executive Committee's  for propaganda work. As one of the deputation Brother Marshall gave a resume  of some of the work they have done and how they have had been recognized as representing the enginemen of this system, and hoped by the help of the members to main tain this position,and not rest till we have every engineman in his own Society. Brother Marshall thanked everyone for the help they had given towards making our Good Friday supper a success, and hoped that we should all meet together again on many future occasions. Brother Niner put in a few remarks for the St. Leonards members, after which we had a good selection of songs and dances given by members from both branches. We finished up about one o'clock in the morning, everyone going home happy and looking forward for the next Good Friday supper 

ONE  WHO WAS THERE

OFFICER SPECIALS

From the 1890s the L.B.S.C.R. arranged excursion for their supervisory staff, the object being making collections for the Company charities. These locomotive would be decorated with Battersea and New Cross loco sheds competing against each other for the best decorated locomotive. This practice continued until just before the First World War. After the war these Officers Specials had ended these excursions never returned


 E.J. Bedford Collection

Above Eastbourne (semi round shed) loco shed shows visiting locomotives from Battersea & New Cross Sheds at Eastbourne Shed after working Station Masters and Inspectors special trains to Eastbourne and occasionally to Brighton, from London Victoria and London Bridge.


  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

JUNE 1913

EASTBOURNE

page 268

SIR,—I wish to extend my sincere thanks to those members of Brighton, Horsham, Eastbourne, St. Leonards, Tunbridge Wells, Portsmouth and Newhaven Branches, who voted for me to represent them at the Annual General Meeting.

A. J. MARSHALL.

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

JUNE 1913


page 263


Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 


Organising Secretary W. Warwick’s report


I am pleased to say that the accident which happened at the locomotive shed at Brighton, and which I mentioned at the close of my report last month, did not terminate fatally, as was at first reported, and so far I have not been called upon to take any further action in the matter.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

EASTBOURNE

JULY 1913 

page 316


Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

 

On Tuesday 15th April, I left Kentish Town for Eastbourne, to attend an inquest. In this case an employee of the Corporation had been knocked down and fatally injured during shunting operations on a siding belonging to the above; the wagons were being propelled into the siding; our member was on the alert and had used his whistle. When this was made known in evidence, the issue turned on the question as to whether the shunter was in front. After a long controversy on this point between the representatives of the company and the Corporation, the jury, without retiring, "brought in a verdict of  “accidental death " and exonerated the company's servants from blame, with a rider that the Corporation should notify their servants not to be on or about this siding when shunting operations were going on.

On the Monday I was at Brighton re the position on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, and on the Tuesday visited the branch room at Stockwell; but on this exceptional occasion not one member turned up and at the time I considered there was small blame attached to them for the apparent indifference, for on that evening we had the worst thunder-storm London has known this year—at least the papers said so the next day and so it must be right. However, I was assured afterwards it was not the severity of the thunder-storm that kept the members away, but the fact that they were nearly all on duty, including the secretary.

The following day I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at New Cross. In this case a gas-fitter, working for the company, had been knocked down and fatally injured, but again our members were free from blame and the whole question turned on the matter of the look-out man. There was one employed, but in his evidence he said he was protecting some bricklayers who were at work at a bridge close by, and so it remained a matter for the Board of Trade and those responsible for the gas-fitters to clear up. The fact remains a life had been sacrificed which possibly might have been saved if there had been someone to give the necessary warning when trains were approaching.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

JULY 1913

OPEN MEETING AT LITTLEHAMPTON

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwickreport

page 316 

My next move was to meet a sub-committee of London. Brighton and South Coast Railway delegates, and then to Littlehampton for an open meeting on the Sunday (4th May). This is a small locomotive centre, but has sufficient to support a branch, and I hope in the near future to be able to open one there. My experience is that all the small centres on the various companies are coming into line and getting a branch of their own instead of being attached to the branches at the larger centres. This is as it should be, because it puts every centre, no matter how small, in direct communication with the General Office, and not only secures them information at first-hand, but so links the whole of the locomotive-men up that all can be in touch with General Office and each other at the shortest possible notice, and so does away with the weak links in the chain which should bind all together. There is no doubt a good deal of truth in.that saying, viz. : that any chain is only as strong as its weakest link. These small centres have been weak links, but I hope in the near future these weak links, will be removed and new ones forged in their stead, in the shape of a branch of our organization, wherever there is the requisite number of men to carry on the same. I am pleased to say this is nearly an accomplished fact in my district, as I have had the pleasure of opening no less than six such branches this year.

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

JULY 1913

PORTSMOUTH BRANCH

PAGE 328

It is not often a report appears in the Journal under the above heading, but we are still in existence, and the number of special meetings that have been held during the past half year, to combat local grievances, shows that we have not been idle. Perhaps the activity may be accounted for by the system of pin-pricking which some of our members have been subjected to for a long time by petty officialism. Our members- have decided that it must now cease. The trade union spirit prevailing in the branch is of a better quality than I have ever known it before ; it is even permeating some of the “ nons " they can see phantoms of trouble ahead. I don't know that they have anything to- fear, as they are always conspicuous by their absence when there is anything to be done to better their conditions of service, but they are first in the field to- gather in the fruits of someone else's labour.

At our monthly meeting, which had been postponed from June 1st to the 8th to enable Brother Marshall, of Eastbourne, who represented our group at the Leeds Conference, to attend and give a report of the business transacted. Brother Marshall's report, which kept him on his feet for fully one hour and a quarter, proved highly educational and interesting to everyone present. What was lacking in numbers was made up in interest. Duty accounted for some absentees, but it would please the branch officials if some of our sleeping members would turn up- at the meetings and help with some of the spade work that has to be done, and not leave their destinies in the hands of someone else. A few had been affected by the " fusionia " which has charged the air round here of late. But after Brother Marshall got through the correspondence with the N.U.R., over the electrification on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, I think the spirit of "fusion" must have met a premature death, as when Brother Marshall reached that item, there was nothing to be said or questions to be asked. A hearty vote of thanks was proposed to Brother Marshall for the able manner in which he had rendered his report, which would have been longer had not time been so relentless and the appetites so keen. Brother Marshall replied. At the close we had the pleasure of welcoming four new members. We have ample room for the rest of the " nons " when they can drop their apathy, get off the fence and put their shoulders to the wheel and help to work out the salvation of the locomotive-men. 

ONE OF 'EM

On Friday, July 14th of 1913, the Acting General Secretary George Moore and Mr. Walter Hudson, M.P., interviewed Lord Bessborough, Chairman of Directors, and the General Manager of the L.B. & S.C. Railway, to demand the front end of the trains on the newly electrified system for locomotivemen exclusively. The men made a firm stand in support of the deputation named, and Lord Bessborough signed the agreement which gave to locomotivemen the exclusive option on the electric motorman's position. The company sought to get six men from the traffic department, who had been trained, accepted for the positions, but the delegates refused to do that. The position carried the steam drivers' rate of wages, and the agreement thus secured formed a precedent, followed later by the L. & N.W. and other electrified lines. On the L. & N.W., too, the agreement included high rent allowances, and a guaranteed week on the average basis of 240 hours for each four weeks.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


AUGUST 1913


A.S.L.E. & F . POLITICAL FUND. 


Trade Union Act (1913). 


This is to give notice to all members of candidate for any of the afore-mentioned the A.S.L.E. F., that Ballot Papers positions. The Ballot Papers will be sent will shortly be issued to each member of the Society, upon which they can record their vote either for or against the establishment of a Political Fund in connection with this Society. The Political Fund referred to is for the purpose of the payment of any expenses incurred in furthering the candidature of any prospective Member of Parliament adopted by this Society, or for the payment of them so that the printed address will be any expenses in connection with the election of a candidate for any other public office, or for the holding of any political meeting, or for the distribution of political literature or documents in the furtherance of the election of any selected plainly visible, and post the same to the Head Office on or before September 30th, 1913.

GEO. WRIDE, President, 

A. FOX, General Secretary,

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

AUGUST 1913

PURLEY & STOATS NEST BRANCH

(COULSDON)

Page 390

SIR,—I am writing to thank you for the prompt manner in which my claim was attended to and settled to my satisfaction, and I quite appreciate the business like manner of the General Office I had been a Full Benefit member for twenty-two years and can truthfully advise all enginemen, firemen and cleaners to join the A.S.L.E. & F, which will look after their interests in all ways.

Wishing the Society and you every success

Yours faithfully

John Pogmore

 


LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

AUGUST 1913


THE OPENING OF THREE BRIDGES

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 370

On the Friday (17th May) I travelled to Three Bridges, another small locomotive centre on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, where we had a few members attached to our Tunbridge Wells Branch The object of my visit was to prepare for an open meeting on the Sunday, with a view to opening a branch Brother Harrison, of Battersea, Brother Worcester, of Horsham, and a few friends from Brighton, attended, and we had a good meeting , Brother Smith, of Brighton, was in the chair Brother Harrison explained the whole matter relating to the business done by the delegation on the electric and other matters I then talked to them on general matters relating to locomotive-men in particular, and at the close we were able to declare the branch open and elect the necessary officers for the time being, with a stipulation that I should visit them when the books arrived, so as to explain matters to the new secretary.

* Three Bridges where members of the Tunbridge Wells before their branch opened.

John Peters Collection
Three Bridges Driver Alfred Peters on footplate of his loco at Three Bridges
Seniority 15th October 1900

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

AUGUST 1913

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 372

On returning to King's Cross I at once made for London Bridge, in order to reach Streatham in time to attend the inquest mentioned above. In this case a painter's labourer engaged in painting a bridge left his work to get a drink of tea, and in doing so lost his life, being knocked down. Our members never saw the poor fellow beforethe accident, and so at the inquest and the Board of Trade inquiry, which I have since attended, the question turned on the look-out man, the irony of the whole thing being that the poor fellow who was killed was supposed to be, at the time, acting as look-out man for the safety of the others. The verdict was " accidental death.

My next move was to Brighton, for a Board of Trade inquiry and delegate meeting the same day. I attended the Board of Trade inquiry first. In this case, a labourer engaged in emptying an ashpit was very severely injured, in fact it was at first reported that he was dead, but he survived. At the inquiry, our member admitted that his attention had been called to these men in the pit, but after standing there some time, he forgot the circumstance and moved his engine without ascertaining they were clear, a perfectly reasonable thing when we remember the hundred and one things an engineman has to think about these days.

Mr. Main was the inspecting officer and had something to say on the matter of proper protection for these men, as it appeared, up to then, no protection had been afforded, other than looking out for themselves. The delegate meeting was held for the purpose of dealing with the latest phase of the electric question, about which there has been a lot of shuffling, twisting of words, sentences, &c, but I think the men are now on the right track to bring this much-discussed and vexed question to a satisfactory issue, and I hope to be able to report, in my next, that the locomotive men have obtained for themselves exclusively the position of Motormen -which is their just due.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 1913

PAGE 428

BATTERSEA BRANCH

An open meeting was held at the Battersea Town Hall on July 27th, and was largely attended. Mr. Arborne was in the chair, and speeches were delivered by Messrs. A. E. Harrison and J. Cordrey (Battersea), J. Enves (Brighton), G. R. Pullen (New Cross), A. Marshall (East- bourne), R. Atkinson (Neasden), and R. Spice (Peckham). This meeting was called to protest against the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway officials promoting other than locomotive drivers or firemen to motormen. Mr. A. E. Harrison explained that two from the traffic department were now acting as motormen who were not twenty-one years old, and were standing senior to men who had been in the company’s employ over fifteen years, and that out of fifty-two vacancies only eighteen had been filled by locomotive-men, and this had a serious effect on locomotive-men. Some drivers were being reduced to firemen, and in consequence they suffered a reduction of 2s. per day. This required consideration and a determination to prevent any further reductions when the extension now being proceeded with was completed. He also explained that most of these men were members of a trade union, and had so far departed from the principle of trade unionism as to learn motor-driving in their own time. Letters were read that had passed between our Head Office and Mr. Williams, general secretary of the N.U.R., and surprise was expressed that the actions of trade unionists in learning motoring in their own time, free of expense to the company, were not repudiated. Brother J. Cordrey, in his remarks, asked all present, if they did not know any particular part of the road, was it likely that they would be prepared to ride on the engine in their own time? He maintained it was the same thing. He likewise stated these men were stealing from us the front of the the train, which was ours by right. Theother speakers enlightened those present of the grave position which might be caused by these traffic men continuing to be employed as motormen. Mr. J. Cordrey then moved the following resolu- tion, which was seconded by Mr. R. Atkinson, and carried unanimously:— " Seeing by the half-yearly report of the honourable board of directors to the shareholders that the electric traction is to be extended very considerably in the near future, and taking into consideration the serious results likely to accrue to the enginemen, owing to the electric traction taking the place of steam power and subsequent displacement of locomotive- men, the men are of the opinion that in every vacancy occurring on the electric system it should be filled by a footplate- man ; and to allow this being put into practical operation, we suggest that any vacancy as motormen occurring on the electric system an approved driver be allowed to fill the position; and should the electrification be the means of displacing any senior men, they should be given work on the electric system at the maximum electric rate. This suggestion we consider would not in any way deplete the locomotive staff, as it would only be filling up vacancies from the men displaced. This would also make sure of the company always having a competent staff to deal with the electrification, who could at any time or for any reason be transferred to the electric system or vice versa." Questions were asked and answered satisfactorily. Among those present were some of the traffic motormen and leading members of the N.U.R. Battersea Branch. I was pleased to see that they thought the resolution a just one, as they did not oppose it or ask questions against it. A similar thing might occur when other companies' lines are electrified, and my advice to the locomotive-men is : Beware lest you have your job stolen from you with your eyes wide open by your so-called brothers in unity. The motto is : Join your own Society, otherwise your outlook for having charge of the front end of the train is endangered. Remember the electric fever is on all railways, and ere long good bye to our locomotives. So wake up is the advice of

ONE OF THE BOYS 

 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

SEPTEMBER 1913

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 413


I returned home next day, and again visited the Law Courts, but finding our case was 

still a little way down the list, I went on to Battersea, transacted some business there,

and returned in time to hear the argument for and against the company

liability following day I attended two open meetings at Battersea, and also visited Guy’s 

Hospital with the intention of seeing a member of our Slades Green Branch, but was 

very pleased to find that he had left for a convalescent home. 

The two meetings mentioned were for the purpose of fully and finally explaining the position re the electric question, before asking the men to sign a petition asking for a further interview with the directors, and at the same time giving the delegates power to see the matter through on behalf of all the locomotivemen on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway.

then attended a Board of Trade inquiry at Streatham Common re a fatal accident to a 

painter's labourer. I explained this case in my last notes after attending the inquest. Mr. 

Armytage was the inspecting officer and his inquiry was directed chiefly to the question 

of a look-out man. 

The foreman painter said he was acting as look-out man while on the job, and when 
going away he left the poor fellow who had met his death in that important position. 
When Mr. Armytage questioned this foreman as to his knowledge of signals it transpired he did not know the front from the back, or the " distant" from the " home "; but that is a matter for the Board of Trade and the company. Our men were in no way to blame. 

The following day, Sunday, I attended and addressed open meetings at Horsham and 

Brighton, both being fairly well attended. 


The meeting at Horsham was in the morning and a few of our brothers accompanied me 

from that place to- Brighton. In this, as in many other cases, I put in a fourteen hour 

day. However, as I believe some good was achieved at both places I feel compensated.

 Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


POLEGATE JUNCTION DERAILMENT


30th SEPTEMBER 1913


Accident at Polegate Junction on 30th September 1913

PETER GILLIES COLLECTION


INVOLVING TUNBRIDGE WELLS ENGINEMEN

DRIVER FRENCH & HIS FIREMAN UNKNOWN

When the train left Victoria at 11.25 yesterday morning was within a quarter mile of Polegate Junction near Eastbourne, the engine suddenly left the rails, tore up for a distance of about 200 yards, and then came to a standstill. The passengers were shaken but escaped injury. The engine driver, French, who lives at Tunbridge Wells, was not so fortunate. Believing that the engine was about to overturn, he and the fireman endeavoured to jump clear, and reaching the bank, they rolled down in the direction of the line. French received cuts in the hand and arms, and the fireman was greatly shaken.

Conflicting statements were made as to the cause of the accident. When the engine driver rose to his feet he exclaimed. “There is a man running across the fields.” Injuries were made, and it was discovered that the man was a passenger who had travelled by the train and was hurrying to Polegate station to catch another.

Mr Sydney Wardingley, of Eastbourne accompanied the guard of the train to the spot at which the accident occurred and made an inspection. He found that some stones were wedged between the main rail and the guard rail, but stated that it would be possible to say, with any degree of certainty, that the stones had been wilfully placed on the line.

Mr. Arnold Hills, who has been prominently associated with Thames Ironworks, was a passenger in the train. He was accompanied by a nurse and a male attendant. The station master at Polegate sent a number of porters to convey Mr. Hills to the station in time to catch an early train to Eastbourne, where he was staying. Last evening he stated that felt no ill effects from the accident.

A breakdown gang and a steam crane were soon on the scene, and within a few hours the engine was removed by the breakdown gang and traffic resumed
The East Sussex police are investigating the statement that a number of boys were expected of placing stones on the line.

NEWSPAPER REPORT IS NOT KNOWN

RAILWAY MAGAZINE

SEPTEMBER 1913


EASTBOURNE RAILWAYMEN

The passenger staff at Eastbourne under Mr. William Holdaway numbers ninety there, including tickets, porters, signalmen, guards, booking and parcel clerks, etc. There are also numerous outside porters licensed to use the station. The goods department is under the charge of Mr, Brigs, with about 100 men, while Mr, R.J. Glendening, locomotive foreman, has about the same number, including drivers, firemen and the running shed staff. There are also four carriage examiners.

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

A COLLISION AT BOGNOR SEPTEMBER 1913

   LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

OCTOBER 1913


EDITOR’S NOTES

THE "CLOSED SHOP"


Much is being said and written in regard to the virtues or otherwise of the principle of the “close shop” in industry. We think it right to say that, in a general way at least, most of those who are Trade Unionist by conviction would prefer to see men voluntarily joining unions rather than being compelled to do so by the conditions attaching to their place of work.
Unfortunately, however, there are still those who will trade on the activities of their colleagues and who will decline either tmeet the necessary cost of running trade unions and providing benefits, oto lend morasupport by acquiring membership of their appropriate union. This the real Trade Unionist is entitled to expectThe necessitfor exertinpressure upon certain individualto becommembers oTrade Unions thus becomes apparent from  time to time.

Wbelieve thaonlbe effectively operated ithe conditionimposed are that the worpeople shall be requested to joitheiappropriatTrade UnionsThese must bunions affiliateto thTrades Union Congress ancaterinfor the particulatype oworkeconcerned. In so far athrailways are concerned, thiwoulmeathat all driversmotormen, firemen and cleanershouljoin the A.S.L.E.F., and if those who desire to see the "closed shop" within the railway service are prepared to accept this, they will find no opposition from the headquarters of the A.S.L.E. & F. Indeed, we should welcome a statement of this description. In the absence of any such undertaking, the creation of an effective “closed shop” is very doubtful of success. 

We commend this suggestion to all those who are seriously interested in the “closed shop” principle.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

OCTOBER 1913

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 467

Between August 14th to 23rd I attended to business in connection with our Westminster and Battersea Branches, and also attended two open meetings at Guildford The Battersea matter was an open meeting re the electrification, which it was necessary to hold so that every locomotive-man might have an opportunity of knowing exactly how matters stood, 
what was being done, and how far the matter had been carried by the delegates That word electrification is getting burnt into me I have used it so often m the last few months that it’s getting quite commonplace in my reports and letters, and if I am not able to drop it to some extent soon I am afraid our readers will begin to think I've got it on the brain “ so to speak The difficulty is that probably thousands of our readers find it somewhat difficult to fully realize the absolute necessity there is for sticking to this matter just now, and the far reaching effects it is likely to have in the near future, not only on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway locomotive men, but on large numbers of the locomotive men of practically every company in the kingdom more especially on the large numbers of men stationed in and around London To begin with, there are rumours of extensions on practically all the present electric railways, then several of the trunk lines having termini in London are discussing the electrification seriously at their half-yearly meetings I find the chairman of the London and South Western Railway told the shareholders some time ago that the question of the development of the suburban traffic would be taken seriously in hand and he hoped at no distant date the board would be able to tell them what their policy would be in the direction of electrification. It was only a question of careful consideration so as to get the best system. Then the London and North-Western Railway has built a new line—Broad "Street to Watford—which I understand is to be worked by electricity, and will no doubt displace numbers of locomotive-men at both the London and Watford ends. Also, the Midland Railway is bound 
by its agreement in taking over the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway to electrify within seven years. That does not necessarily mean that it will be several years before it comes about. It may come about in the next twelve months ; it’s only a question of will it pay ? Once convinced of that and there is no hesitation in scrapping men or machinery. As some one said a little while ago, “we do not hesitate to scrap machinery five years old"; but the worker in his wisdom is content to live under laws three hundred years old. Bearing in mind the above it looks as though the word  electrification is likely to be with us more in the near future than it has been in the past. When I said its use had begun to weary me of late I referred to the worry 
and unpleasantness which has been going on for some time in the efforts put forth by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railwaymen i:o secure these positions. However, the matter has now reached a climax, and is in the hands of our Executive Committee, and I hope in my next report to be able to inform our readers that for locomotivemen this important question has been settled once for all, because if the London, Brighton and South Coast railwaymen are successful it will mean that the matter is practically settled for other companies’ men, when and wherever electrification comes about.

On Sunday was at Brighton attending what proved to be a momentous delegate  meeting of London, Brighton and South Coast Railwaymen, in as much as it was there decided to hand the question of the locomotive-men’s claim to the front end of the train over to our Executive Committee, which met in London on the following Sunday, to deal with the matter. However this body was unable to deal fully with it, as those in authority on that particular railway were scattered over the known world, and could not be got together under a certain time This time was fixed, and before this appears in print a momentous question for locomotive-men will be peaceably settled in their favour.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

NOVEMBER 1913

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 511

I closed my last report with a prophecy that has not been literally fulfilled, which shows how risky it is to assume the role of the prophet. However, I believe it is all a matter of time. In writing of the electric question on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, and the locomotive- men's claim to the front end, I assumed the directors, who, as then stated, were on their holidays, would have been back and dealing with the question in the six weeks which had to elapse before the issue of last Journal, but it has not turned out just that way. At the time of writing they are arranging to meet the men's deputation to again consider the question. As I have before pointed out, it is an important question not only for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway locomotive-men, but for all locomotive-men. I believe other companies' men realise" this and are looking to this settlement as a deciding factor for all.  After the delegate meeting at Brightonmentioned in my last report.

The next day, Sunday, I attended a.meeting of our Executive Committee, held in London, re the electrification matter mentioned above.

On the Friday journeyed to Portsmouth to inquire into and get particulars of an accident to a London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, fireman, a member of that branch. This was another case of insufficient time, or perhaps, rather a want of a proper place and time to do the needful by way of oiling. Our brother was underneath, carrying out this all-important duty on the level while standing in the station. It is what is known as a pull and push job and one coach is taken off in the middle of the day. The shunting engine came on for the purpose of doing this while our brother was underneath for the purpose of facilitating business. There were two shunters present, one hooking the coach while the other hooked on the engine. The one hooking on came out first, and the driver of the shunting engine says he had a signal from him to start, before the other had hooked off, with the result that the motor engine was moved sufficiently far enough to nearly squeeze the life out of our brother who was underneath. Fortunately the brake was hard on and the engine stopped in the nick of time, but not before he had been badly crushed. However, he has got over it fairly well and was at work again when I attended the Board of Trade inquiry a few days ago. Another instance of the unnecessary risks our men are called upon to take in order to save a little delay. The same advice applies here as above. The question is : When will our men act upon it and so abolish these risks ? 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

DECEMBER 1913

PORTSMOUTH BRANCH

PAGE 567

Some months have come and gone since a report appeared in the Journal from this branch, not because there has not been one sent, but it was evidently crowded out of the October Journal, and a bit out of date for November Nevertheless it is not always the clock that ticks the loudest that keeps the best time, for the Portsmouth Branch has been keeping good time We held an open meeting on October 12th 'when the speakers billed to give addresses were Messrs Warwick and Coombes. Owing however to Executive Committee business Brother Coombes was unable to be with us Mr G W Porter, secretary of the Trades and Labour Council, one of our old friends, took the chair and right well did he fill that position He reviewed the progress of trade unionism in the South of England, and gave some jolly good sound advice to all present, the ladies included, who had been invited for the first time in the history of this branch There was a certain amount of pessimism with regard to the ladies, but that was dispelled when they turned up in such numbers, and I have had the question put to me as to when we are going to ha\ e another meeting and invite the ladies. I think they had better wait and see for the present We had an audience of well over one hundred. Mr Warwick's subjects were the electrification and the Eight Hour Day, and most ably did he handle these subjects for over an hour Electrification is rather a hot question here, as it has hit our London, Brighton and South Coast members hard, but is likely to hit the South Western Railway members harder, what with the slow promotion and the closing in of duties, so that the men scarcely get time to open their food baskets ; the men are realizing that the Eight Hour Day is a long time overdue There was a few questions asked, one of our respected N U R friends being very keen on the question of fusion, but the chairman ruled it out of order as not being the subject of the address One of our members chimed in and said we should fuse when the members agree to do so, evidently meaning it was not the organizers who decided that question but the members Mr Warwick then made a presentation to the branch chairman, Brother H J Tagg who was leaving to take up a position on the Bengal and Nagpuir Railway The present took the form of a safety razor Brother Warwick hoped he would have many a close shave and all the members wished Brother Tagg every success in the future With a few more remarks from our genial chairman the meeting closed with the usual vote of thanks to him and Mr Warwick for their services At our monthly meeting on November 2nd, we had a good muster After the usual business we had a report of our delegate who attended a conference at Salisbury re the electrification which we hope will be carried to a successful issue Brother Harrison of Battersea was present by request to square up a little misunderstanding that had arisen the members accepting his explanation of what transpired Brother Harrison then made a presentation to Brother W Thompson who is leaving to take up a position in Burma This present took the form of a shaving set Brother Harrison conveyed the good wishes of the branch to Brother Thompson, who suitably replied At the close we had the pleasure to welcome fifteen new members, which brings us well over one hundred members now, with promises of some more for next meeting One came over from the all-grade ship quite on his own That we shall soon have the few outstanding ones ere long is the wish of

BRANCH SECRETARY 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

DECEMBER 1913

Extracted from A.S.L.E.F. 

Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

page 557


On returning from Leicester I travelled to Portsmouth for the purpose of attending a Board of Trade inquiry as to the cause of injury to a member of that branch, and reported by me in last month’s Journal The firemen on both engines were our members, but I had only to watch the interests of the injured one, as the fireman on the shunting engine was on the opposite side of his engine and knew nothing of the signal said to have been given by the shunter to the driver and so was not called. The driver asserted that the shunter gave him a signal to start after hooking on, but the shunter was quite as definite in his assertion that he did not do so, and in addition called a witness in the person of a carriage cleaner, who said he did not see any signal given, but had to admit he was some distance away at the time, the driver was a member of the N U R , but unrepresented I think the outcome will be the issue of instructions for the oiling to be done in a .safer place in the future at the discretion of the driver.The pity is that such things have to happen before our men can be convinced that they are taking necessary risks; of course, it’s all a question of speeding up and insufficient time to do the needful, hence the absolute necessity for locomotive-men to organize in their own Society, so as to be able to act together in abolishing these risks.

On returning home I visited Hammersmith and Turnham Green re matters concerning our Westminster Branch, and also attended the branch meeting, and then left for Portsmouth for the purpose of addressing an open meeting on the Sunday. 
Ladies had been invited to this meeting, and right well did they respond, which went to make it one of the best ever held m that place At the close I made a presentation to one of our members who was leaving for service abroad Altogether we had a good time, and all went away highly satisfied with the result. From Portsmouth I travelled home, via London Bridge, with the hope of meeting Mr Moore, assistant secretary, who had an appointment that day with the directors and general manager of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway re the still vexed question of electrification and the claim of locomotive-men to the same Mr Moore, however, had got upstairs before I arrived, and so I had to visit him in the evening to know the result. 

The following day I visited Peckham for a few particulars re a slight collision that had occurred at London Bridge, and the next day I spent with the London, Brighton and South Coast delegation, which was meeting the directors for their decision m the above-mentioned matter I am sorry they again refused to grant the reasonable claim of the locomotive-men to the front end of the train exclusively and so the matter still remains unsettled, awaiting the further decision of the men

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL


NOT THE GREATEST OF PRANKS!!


From RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR


Brighton Driver Ferguson and his young Fireman, Harry Williams, were not on the best of terms and apparently had not spoken to each other for some days. Things come to ahead on the 2nd December, 1913, when they were working on their engine, No.373 Billinghurst. 

They were working empty stock from Brighton to Hastings for transfer to the South Eastern & Chatham Railway. Ferguson was near retiring age and had recently had been removed from the top link at Brighton because of failing health, so it was not surprising that a much 
younger man with a plenty of energy and new ideas roused his anger and dislike. The sidings at Brighton were left at 9.47 p.m. with a train of thirteen S.E. & C.R. six-wheelers and a bogie brake van, and Lewes was reached in due course, where water was taken during the stay of over an hour awaiting the arrival of a horse box. it was, therefore, 11.32 p.m. before the journey recommenced and Ferguson was feeling the strain of a long spell on the footplate for he had signed on for light duties at 2.10 p.m. by Glynde he had dozed off leaning against the cab side and noticing this at once, Williams decided to have his own back by playing a trick on his unsuspecting partner. So opening the doors on his side of the cab, he placed his cap, sweat rag and shovel on the floor boards to suggest he had in advertently fallen overboard. Next he clambered along the running plate, round the smokebox and back to Ferguson’s side of the engine where he tapped the lookout window until the old driver awoke with a start. Looking around and finding the footplate untenanted, he immediately jumped to the expected conclusion and applied the brakes, but in his dazed state forgot that the train was vacuum fitted and panicked when the speed was not immediately reduced. So, not realizing his error, he whistled the guard for an emergency stop and reversed the engine which brought the train to such a ragged stop that the couplings between the 5th and 6th coaches parted. After a hurried consultation, the guard ran to protect the rear of the train with detonators while Ferguson walked the half a mile to Polegate signal box for help and Williams crept away from the engine to hide in a ditch until it was clear for a dash back along the track to where he could lie down and pretend to be injured. As soon as the guard had retreated to his van Williams made haste through the line side fields until he calculated it was safe to return to the track. Unfortunately his luck was out for a local poacher was on the run and as he passed Williams he thrust a brace of pheasants into his arms before disappearing into the darkness, where he froze in some bushes leaving Williams to crash around in confusion until gathered up by three keepers and marched him off to the police station. Back at the train, assistance eventually arrived and the carriages were stabled for the night at Polegate, but the mystery of the missing fireman was only solved in the morning in the magistrate courts. Williams was acquitted with a severe warning only to find the company awaiting a full explanation of his conduct the previous evening. The truth could not be hidden and once the whole story was unraveled, Ferguson was placed on the retired list as being unfit for engine driving, while Williams was dismissed the company services. 

Some years later the Isle of Wight central railway advertised for staff and Harry Williams was accepted as Fireman. Time must have rung the changes for he was quickly promoted driver and then shed foreman at Newport before being called to the colours in early 1917. He survived hostilities and entered the Southern Railway at grouping to become shed foreman at Dorchester and later Salisbury before retiring as an inspector in the second world war.

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