1931


Deductions of 2 1/2 - 5 per cent from wage of railway workers in 

force under the National Wages Board Finding No.119 

(January)

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

JANUARY 1931

TUNBRIDGE WELLS BRANCH

On November 27th an interesting presentation took place to one of our oldest members, Bro. James Edwards, who retired on November 19th, after completing 45 years in the Loco. Dept., L.B. & S.C.R. and Southern Railway. Bro. J. F. Brett presided over a large and representative company, including wives and other pensioners. Bro. Stephen Rogers, in a neat speech, eulogised the integrity of “Jimmy” as a trade unionist and locoman, and presented to Bro Edwards a handsome oak Westminster chime timepiece, pie and tobacco, and to Mrs J. Edwards an umbrella. Bro. J. Edwards suitably acknowledged. Many musical and humorous items were contributed during the evening, and to all we extend our best thanks. Votes of thanks to host and hostess and the presentation committee brought an excellent evening to a close.

CHAIRMAN

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


FEBRUARY 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH


A happy and successful New Year to our organisation and all its members, leaders and 
officers, and I trust we shall come through the critical time ahead successfully. What we have we must hold; let us all pull together. Brighton will show that we mean to hold what we have got. Remember 1924 and 1926, Brighton was to the front. Branch meetings are having better attendances, which shows men are interested in the future events. At our last meeting we made more new members; they are coming fast. Our new secretary, Bro F. Stevenson, is now getting busy, Bro. Beall is his assistant. Bro. Beall has been our secretary for the last eight years, and he has served us and the organization well. He has had a busy time, and I think he has earnt a rest. His health has not been as he would like it to be recently, but we hope he will now regain it, and I am sure we wish him the best. A true trade unionist in every respect. I am sorry to report that for the first time we have lost a seat on the L.D.C. this was no doubt brought about by Bro. A. Clack resigning after two years as secretary. Driver F. Patching has put up three years in succession, and Bro. Clack’s resignation gave him his chance. The new committee is; Bro. Galyer, Bro. F. Stevenson, and F. Patching (N.U.R.) Bro. S. J. Downs was defeated. We are very interested in the re-starting of District Councils, seeing that we were the first to move in that direction. We trust other branches will see the usefulness and send representatives to the meetings; they will then serve a useful purpose. 

By the time we get February’s Journal our Annual Children’s Treat will be over, taking place on January 29th, at the Labour Club, and with great assistance of the ladies’ branch will no doubt be a great success as in the past. After the children’s treat, our next function will be our Annual Dinner on Good Friday, April 3rd. we shall be pleased to see any of our comrades from out stations, and assure them a good time at the Old Ship Hotel, King’s Road. We hope to have 200 attend this year; a dance will follow dinner until midnight. Any information can had from the secretary, Driver A. Clack

CHAIRMAN

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

FEBRUARY 1931


BOGNOR & LITTLEHAMPTON BRANCH 

 

A few words from us I am sure will not come amiss. Firstly, a glance back over 1930, I believe gives us a satisfactory reflection. Certainly one or two matters that were unforeseen I have no doubt will be remedied before overtaking us in the New Year. Here I must mention that it Is a great asset to have a foreman who is always ready to listen to reasonable suggestions for betterment of our working conditions, and furthermore will also assist in alleviating any difficulties, sometimes, as I am aware, at a good deal of personal inconvenience; also, to have satisfaction expressed for our carrying out allotted duties was, to say the least, surprising, but nevertheless greatly appreciated. We can do no better than make 1931 even more successful, that is providing the companies leave well alone.

To enter into 1931, I must first of all express my appreciation of the apparent confidence shown in me again by electing me as your secretary, and I take this opportunity of thanking one and all, and trust there will be no cause for you to regret your choice. It is also well worth mentioning, that with the exception of one most desiring re-election, all other 1930 officers were returned unanimously. That in itself, I think, expresses a great deal. I would also congratulate the members upon the way contributions were paid and several cases of arrears wiped off. These in some cases, be it noted, before the Companies’ proposal were known. Judging from the present situation, I don’t think the arrears for December will be much to talk about. Whilst broaching the subject of the companies’ suggestions that are staring us in the face, I am relying upon this branch to respond to the “Stand to Arms” call, should it be necessary to sound same. We, of course, are aware that our two slugs are awaiting the opportunity to still further deprive us of a decent standard of living. It is pleasing to note that our E.C. have taken the time is not far distant when wedge will be driven completely home. It is beyond understanding why men who call themselves “Trade Unionists” can find time to associate with such scum. Furthermore, to listen to them and be influenced by what they say gets me groggy. Dirty, low-down, sneak thieves, and yet some of you are afraid to treat them in the manner they should be treated-sooner go and treat them to half-a-pint of beer. So would I? Still, it doesn’t seem to have much effect. I’ve talked till I’m very nearly sick with talking, so I only hope the day isn’t very far distant when others methods will deal with them. In conclusion, I would again remind certain members that our branch meetings are still held at the Terminus Hotel, Bognor Regis and the Labour Hall Littlehampton. With fond hoped that the New Year will be much brighter than present outlook affirms. 

  

BRANCH SECRETARY

BOGNOR & LITTLEHAMPTON BRANCH

The amalgamated branches of Bognor & Littlehampton ended with both locations re-opening their own indecent branch
 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


MARCH 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH


Bravo! Coventry – 100 per cent. strong. Brighton congratulates you and wish we could say 
the same. We have been trying hard during the past year to bring our branch up to 100 per 
cent., but whilst we have not succeeded members are rolling in fast, 12 more enrolled on 
February 1st, and more to follow. Like Bognor Regis, we have some “slugs” – not two, but a 
dozen, 15/- a day men – who cannot afford to belong to the organization, but they like the 
conditions the trade union won for them; they can a gamble on the football or cards, 
something for nothing. The conditions the Companies are trying to enforce on us to-day are 
the conditions they enjoy. “Slugs” you call them – thank you, Bognor, it fits them grand – see 
them reading in the Daily Herald every day, the Wages Board report.

At our last branch meeting we decided to congratulate Bro. Bromley on the way he put our 
case before the National Wages Board. We are told cleaners have refused promotion. We have cleaners here who would like to 
have the chance of promotion – still cleaning, started 1919 – and now electricity staring them 
in the face. What prospects? I am pleased to mention Bro. Jack Galyer has been selected to 
the A.A.D., 1931.Bro. G. Teague’s case is no further ahead, but I think we shall hear 
something interest soon. Bro. Teague has been off duty since December 21st, 1928, and I 
wish to thank all who have assisted us for the last 18 months to keep his end up. The social 
committee have ceased to run dances at the Labour Club owing to lack of support, the dances having been run at a great loss. 

The Women’s Committee are carrying on, and run a dance alternate Fridays.The annual 
Children’s Tea Party, Christmas Tree, and Dance was held on January 29th, organized by the 
joint social committees, and was a great success. Over 160 attended, and a most enjoyable 
time was spent. A local dancing troupe gave a performance, which the children and all 
present appreciated and the teacher of the troupe was presented with a bouquet. The 
Christmas Tree was well loaded and Bro. F. Jones, as Father Christmas, presented every 
child with a gift. Bro. F. Larkin was M.C., assist by Mrs. E. Carter. Bros. Larkin and Jones had a fine time amusing the little ones. 

The ladies’ secretaries, Mrs. Andrews and Mrs. E. Carter, and committee, deserve all praise 
for the way they carried out their part of the arrangements. In conclusion. I extend the thanks 
of the branch committee of both sections for the splendid way everything was carried out to give pleasure to those able to attend. it was the best children’s party the branch has ever held.


CHAIRMAN

Railway accident on the 


Southern Railway 


Brighton Section


Beddingham Crossing 23rd May 1931

SEE SUB PAGE

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


APRIL 1931

 

BRIGHTON BRANCH


We held our area conference at Brighton on Thursday, March 5th. We were pleased to have 
with us Mrs. Mayes, of our E.C., 18 delegates and several visitors. A very interesting 
afternoon was spent, several lively discussions taking place. After the conference delegates 
and visitors sat down to a very enjoyable tea, which was much appreciated by all. A dance 
followed in the evening from 8 to 11 p.m. The only regret was the absence of many of our 
branch members. Brighton, take a pattern from Cambridge. What a fine spirit: that surely is 
the real success of trade unionism, unity.

May I, through this Journal, appeal to the men and women to work with a comradely spirit? 
We are all out for the good of the cause. Trade unionism means unity, not discord. Let us shut our ears to grousers and grumblers. Let us carry on with the good work; put every atom of energy into building up the society. We shall then be able to look back and say we have done our bit towards the advancement of trade unionism. Where should we be without it, friends? 

We have taken what it has given us; let us give a little in return,  just our services. Work 
together, fight the good fight for each other. If we do this, friends, think how much happier we shall fell; think how much easier it will be for the faithful few who still carry on

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


APRIL 1931


BOGNOR BRANCH


February 8th marked the occasion of a very pleasant function, by the presentation of a nice chimney clock inscribed, to the Host and Hostess of our branch-room. We had the pleasure of a visit from our Organizer, Bro. Barton Wild, to perform this little ceremony, and naturally enough it was carried out in his usual manner. It may, perhaps, strike some readers as a being a little out of the ordinary making presentations to hotel proprietors, so I would point out that the greatest consideration and kindness has always been extended to us and not a penny in rent will be accepted. I think I am right in saying that a good many railwaymen other than our locals know “Old Jim.” Bro. Wild remarked that this was about the most unique presentation that he had made some hundreds. Firstly, he thanked these good people for their kindness to this branch, and drew attention to the fact that had it not been for the like of such in days gone by many a branch would have been stranded for a meeting-room, as they invariably came to rest at some hotel or other, but he could not recollect another case of the landlord refusing to take any rent. I must also point out that in lieu of the rent allowed by Head Office for branch-rooms, they kindly headed the list with that amount. Bro. Wild, following the presentation, addressed the meeting on the current situation on the railways. Although the majority of us have been following the reports very closely, we could not help but be amazed at the figures that Bro. Wild quoted and what they actually meant when placed before us in such a lucid manner. It certainly leaves no doubt in our minds as to what action we shall take should the companies’ proposals, or anything like them, be the final decision of the N. W. B.  In view of the information imparted to us, there must be no thought of a reduction, but rather must we continue to press our claims to the fullest extent. I cannot but think of the effrontery of the companies to have come forward with demands in face of figures, which are their own, as placed and explained before us. I would here suggest to all branches that have not yet had someone down to put the matter in front of them as we have, to do so at the earliest opportunity, and if there is anybody with weak knees afterwards, well they are not worth their salt. This meeting unanimously rerecorded their decision to stand by any action that our E.C. may determine upon. Bro. Wild, of course, touched upon the “Slugs” as we familiarly know them now, and strangely enough, his remarks coincided very nicely with my version in a recent Journal. I was surprised to hear that a certain amount of annoyance was caused these reptiles following those remarks. I say I am surprised, although somewhat gratified, for I did not imagine that anything could penetrate their thick skins, other than the loss of the 50 per cent. Remarkable how they are always the first to be aggrieved when they don’t get everything that we have fought and paid for. I am still longing for the time when they won’t be entitled to it. I wonder when the companies will emerge from their trance, and realize the economies they could effect on the articles? Anyway, we are getting off the road a bit. To revert back to our evening, Bro. Wild concluded his remarks and replied to questions, and the meeting closed with a drink from our host and hostess, who joined us and toasted “Our Health,” which was very heartily reciprocated. 

W. LAWRENCE, 

Branch Secretary.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


JUNE 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH


I am pleased to report we are making good progress with the “nons.,” but we still have about 
fourteen 15/- a day “slugs.” only wish that they could be made to suffer a greater reduction 
than all trade unionist. I wonder  if they realize how we should have fared if we had not had 
the union to fight for us, and they have face enough to say the union made a good fight for us. 

My God! If they only think where we should get to if we were all like them. Fancy main-line 
men “nons.”; cleaners 7/- and 9/6 a day trade unionist what a contrast.

At our branch meetings we had a fine discussion on the E.C. resolution re National Wage 
Board Findings. We had good meeting and evening, and decide against the resolution. We 
were prepared to stand by the decision of the Special A.A.D. whichever way it went.

I am pleased to report Bro. G. Teague is progressing, and that all that can be done for him is 
being done, and I trust we shall soon have him back with us. I still appeal to members to 
attend branch meetings more regularly and support the officers you elected.


CHAIRMAN

Railway accident on the 


Southern Railway 


Brighton Section



London Bridge 16th July 1931 

involving Acting Motorman W.J. Gulliver Depot unknown 

SEE SUB PAGE


PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


AUGUST 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH 


I am pleased to report we are still making new members, and I wish to remind members to 
keep up their contributions paid up and let us prepared for next March. It is the strength we 
want and if all try we shall get the few “nons” into the organization. 

We much regret the loss of Bro, H. Funnell, following so quickly after our late Bro. F. 
Constable. We have lost two good workers and true trade unionist. Bro. Funnell has held 
many offices in the branch: chairman, vice chairman, member of committee for many years, 
and also served on the L.D.C. He did some very good work. Many members attended the 
funeral, proving how he was respected. A trade unionist whose place will be hard to fill.

At our last meeting, Bro. J. Galyer gave a report of the last A.A.D., and he deserved a much 
larger attendance. His report was the best Brighton has ever heard; he was on his feet 1 ½ 
hours, and what he had to say was very interesting. He was warmly congratulated at the 
close.

At our next branch meeting the Local Death and Retiring Fund comes up for discussion, and 
I hope that all interested in this matter will do their best to attend I appeal to our younger 
men to take an interest in this matter. We are trying to send our old pioneers off as they should be- not “gone and forgotten.”

I have to report that the Social Committee will still carry on with their efforts during the next 
winter to raise funds for the long over-due Enginemen’s Club, and it is hoped that all 
engineman will assist with dances, etc. 


CHAIRMAN

 A.C. PERRYMAN COLLECTION

Engine Driver Harry Funnell (18.10.1889) & his Fireman Horace/Harry Fleet () standing on 

Battersea Shed.

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN  

A Southern Railway Motorman inside the cab of the new 

Brighton electric experimental train as 

seen on the 17th November 1931

 Harry Funnell


Bro. Harry Funnell was not only a loco driver by profession, who lived for the job, he was 
also a great locomotive enthusiast

Harry spent over 42 years in the company's service starting at Brighton on the 18th October 
1889, with 20 years, of which, were on the main line, as a typical L.B. & S.C. engineman

He gave freely of his own spare time in order to teach at the Enginemen's Mutual Improvements Class - a time honoured job training scheme which the enginemen conducted on their own behalf during off duty periods. 

Harry was an active member of the Brighton Branch of A.S.L.E.F., and held many offices 
within the Brighton Branch, which included the positions: Chairman, Vice Chairman, and a 
member of the Branch Committee for many years. Harry also served on the L.D.C., 
representing the Branch at many levels.

 

A.C.C. PERRYMAN COLLECTION

Above 


Driver Harry Funnell pictured at Brighton with a L Class Baltic Tank locomotive

His early main line experience was with the Marsh 13 tanks, untihe took over the Baltic 

Tank locomotive, No. 333 ‘Remembrance’ and with many fine runs, with the latter stand to 

his credit, and  personality whose name will be forever associated with these locomotives. 

Upothe advent of the "King Arthurs" at Brighton Shed about 1926, Harry changed t

No.799 Sir Iron side.


With the retirement of Brighton’s Trail Driver Charlie Peters, Harry was appointed to the 

position of Test or TriaDriver in Apri1930, a position that was only to last for just over a 

year. On the 17th June, 1931, Harry had just completea tesrun to Littlehampton, anon 

arriving back at Brightonhe collapseandied beside hiengine, at the age o59. Railway 

enthusiasts thus lost a geniamanever ready to discuslocomotives witthose interested in 

them, by whom he was mucrespected.


Many members from the Brighton Branch attended his funeral, proving how well he was 

respected by his fellow workmates. 


Harry was a true trade unionist whose place will be hard to fill, and will be remembered by 

the Brighton Branch for doing some very good work for our loco-men. 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


OCTOBER 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH

 

With deep regret we record the passing of Bro. W. Clarke (Spanel), at the early age of 47 
years, after a painful illness, wonderfully borne. We have indeed lost a worker. 

Our late Comrade was carried to his last resting place by six of his old colleagues, Inspector 
Enves representing the Company. Other Societies of which Bro. Clarke was a member were 
also represented, over 250 assembling at the grave side, indicating how much our late 
brother was respected. The sympathy of the branch has been sent to Mrs. Clarke

Bro. Clarke was chairman of the social committee; secretary and pioneer of the shed death 
and retiring fund; he has served as a branch chairman; served on committee, L.D.C. and 
strike committees. Bro. Clarke was a great believer in the annual dinner, his opinion being 
that such functions kept more loco-men together. It was also our late brother’s idea to run 
dances to provide for sick members, and to create funds for enginemen at depot to have club 
for their own. But he has gone to the great beyond, and we shall never forget, for indeed we 
have lost a Comrade.

Our members here beginning to realize how much we lost last March. I am sure some never 
realized what they would lose. The Companies want a bit more next March if we 
don’t look out. I advise all members to keep their contributions up to date. We have but a few 
“nons” now, and we shall get them soon- they are beginning to feel the pinch. Of course the 
“slugs” we shall never get.

Branch meetings are being better attended, some of the old face coming back. I hope that they 
will continue to attend, for this is pleasing to myself and other branch officers. The 
Branch congratulated Bro. J Galyer on being elected as the official candidate for the 
forthcoming Sectional Council No.2 election. The L.D.C. have had a busy time just lately and 
it is seen by the agenda some good points have been settled at the last meeting. Our members 
on this body are doing good work for the depot. The question of tube rods is in hand, 150 
engines at depot and no tube rods- economizing at the expense of lost time tickets.

CHAIRMAN

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

OCTOBER 1931

BOGNOR BRANCH

 

Here we are again, not yet extinct, nor likely to be whilst our few live wires keep buzzing. Before commencing the offensive, I express, on behalf of our branch, the deepest sympathy to our Bro. Bill Childs in his irreplaceable loss by the death, at so early an age, of his wife. His remarkably well know along the old Brighton section for a cheery disposition, taking troubles, to all appearance, very lightly, and I have no doubt that he has the sympathy of many of our comrades up and down the system.

The next item of interest will be the retiring of our Branch Chairman, Bro. Tom Woolnough. Other than mentioning that he has qualified for the A.A.D. Award, I do not intend to say a lot at the moment. It may perhaps be of interest to some of the younger fraternity to know that since January 4th, 1891, has Tom been a member of the Associated. Just over 40 years, and I’ll warrant that his contribution was paid when he hadn’t much more than 18 bob to take home. Just think of it, some of you that have been picking up £3 and 18 bob for the last ten to twelve weeks and then have to be chased for a paltry 7/7. 

Instead of begrudging it you ought to advocate for an increase, and give our leaders a little encouragement. It’s only the likes of you and the “slugs” that we have to thank for our present reduction. I have noticed in the past the individuals who are first at the strike pay table are the last to come forward with their contributions. I am going to say here, and now, that there is absolutely no excuse for any of my so-called members to be a farthing in arrears after this summer’s work, and I further defy any one of you to dispute it, for if you can’t afford it now I don’t know how I can expect it in the winter.

I am pleased to notice, however, that the majority of locomen at other depots are beginning to realize the necessity of joining an organization, preferably the A.S.L.E. & F. There doesn’t seem to be much doubt about the fact that we shall be up against the biggest proposition of our career in a few months’ time, and if we are at sixes and sevens, well, we may as well give up the ghost. Now, some of you young chaps, just you put your thinking caps on, and let us be able to include you under the old flag when the call comes. For the present I will retire, not being in a sufficiently fiery frame of mind, but look out for me in December. 

Fraternal greetings to those branches who read and endorsed some remarks of mine a while back.

W. LAWRENCE

Branch Secretary.

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN  


Brighton electric experimental train as seen on 

the 17th November 1931

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


NOVEMBER 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH 


We shall have Bro. Gregory with us on December 6th, and he will address a meeting in the 
morning at 11 a.m., and one in the evening at 6-30 p.m. They will be open meetings. It is a 
long time since we had Bro. Gregory with us, and I hope that all members off duty will try 
and attend one meeting or the other; all members must realize that their wages are in danger. 
I am not the politician that some members of our branch are, but being always interest, I took 
particular notice of the following, which appeared in our local paper here on Saturday, 
October 25, and that, of course, before the General Election:- At a whist drive held at 
Downlands House, Uckfield, on October 1st, the gathering was addressed by Major the Hon. 
C. W. Lowther, ex-M.P., and son of a former Speaker. Major Lowther, said the Socialist 
Government had tried and failed, and were now jibbing at the relief cuts; they could not be 
made to realize that it meant that those who preferred work would make strenuous efforts to 
get it rather than draw benefit. Then the Labour market would be flooded by those prepared 
to work for a lower wage for the same services given by members of trade unions at a much 
higher cost.

I wish all members to note that in the near future they will try to bring about what this fellow 
has said, so we must get as strong as we can and stand as one to hold what we have got. So 
come and hear Bro. Gregory- he will enlighten you.

I wish to appeal to all members to vote for our candidates of in the coming L.D.C. election, 
and we shall get the seat back we lost last year. The election of officers for 1932 should be on 
December 6th; but as Bro. Gregory is paying us a visit they will be held on Sunday, 
December 20th, at 10-30 a.m.

The social committee report that the Children’s Annual Tea Party will be held at the 
Aquarium, the first week in January. Age of children to be 6 to 13 years of age, and only 
children of members who are fully paid up at quarter end will be allowed to attend. We are 
expecting a fine gathering, and hope to give the children a fine time. A Dance will be held 
from 9 p.m. till 12 midnight, at the price of one shilling, to help with expenses, which will be great.

A Dance is also being held at the Aquarium, on New Year’s Eve, 8 p.m. till 1 a.m. 

 

“CHAIRMAN”

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


DECEMBER 1931


BRIGHTON BRANCH 

 

I wish to impress on all members that it is important they should attend their branch meetings 
more often and give the branch some encouragement for the time put in attending to business 
of the branch. Remember, we have other business to do as well as other members have, so 
come to your meetings every other Sunday at 10-30 a.m. You will find it interesting and hear 
how things are going along. We hope to have Bro. Squance down to see us in the near future. 

If apathy exists let us cut it out and get on with the job.  We have a good secretary and a 
worker- help him. The note you all have had referring to contributions is for your good as 
well as for the organization; it informs you that Rule 5, clause 17, will operate, commencing 
1932. So you all have time to get clear before the end of the year. Remember, you are the 
organization!

Just a word about the “nons.” That are still in our midst. I feel sure if we try we can get the 
“nons.” In before the end of the year. The most amusing part to me is the “nons.” Who take 
the Journal every month, and some are Assurance members. I should like to publish a list of 
them and put it up in the lobby; they have skins like a rhinoceros. Then of course, we have the “slugs,” that get everything they can but never help! I hope, when they read this, it will prick 
their consciences – if they have any.

The shed death and retiring funds now wound up, the last three claims having been paid. In 
future all old pioneers are going to be sent away as they should. The new fund means you 
what you like, and I hope all members will support it; give a man what you think he is worth. 

It means that for all who retire a list will be put up; if a man has been a good man with his 
fellow workers, supported them and been a trade unionist, he is worth sending off in the way 
he deserves; but if he’s been a “slug,” well, I leave that to you- send him off in the way he 
deserves.

Well fellow-workers, the General Election has been forced on us, and will be over by the time 
this is published, but I hope that all trade unionist will have supported the only party that can 
and will do anything for the workers.

A dance will be held at the Aquarium on December 31st, in aid of the funds for the annual 
children’s tea party, and we hope for the support of all members to help us with this function.

  

CHAIRMAN

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

Brighton Loco Works Engine

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

DECEMBER 1931

BOGNOR BRANCH


It is with altogether mixed feelings that I pen this report. Pride and pleasure intermingled with sad regrets. Dealing with the last named, Sunday, November 8th, was momentous occasion for a branch such as ours. Mr. J. Bromley was honouring us with a visit, for the ostensible purpose of making a presentation to our branch chairman, Bro. T. Woolnough, upon his retirement. Combing business with pleasure, a propaganda meeting was later arranged for the afternoon. This was advertised from Portsmouth to Brighton, and Brighton to Horsham, with fond expectations of a goodly attendance. Alas! for those hopes. 

Admittedly, the train service leaves much to be desired, but that to my mind is not sufficient reason to lose an opportunity of hearing our General Secretary. There are, I believe, other means of transit that would have been well worth while, considering if the spirit was there. Even though I am prepared to make allowances for our neighbours in that respect, I certainly have no intentions whatever of making any of Bognor. What consideration! What respect! to allow Mr. Bromley to travel 70 miles to address you, and you hadn’t even got the decency-that’s the mildest expression I can think of at the moment-to attend. Do any of you ever consider a person’s feelings? Yes, I suppose you do, but they are generally your own. “Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof” I can only presume to be the motto of you slackers. Well, all I can say is, those of you who were so conspicuous by your absence in missing our General’s remarks missed an education. I cannot dwell on those remarks, but must stress one point that he considers essential, and that is, “Attend your branch meetings.”

The pleasurable side now enters. At 7-45 p.m. the stage was set for the testimonial to our old comrade, Tom Woolnough, and lo! And behold, the audience is quite large. Bro. J. Galyer, from Brighton, opened the proceedings, and in well-chosen words gave a brief outline of the object of this gathering, and called upon myself for a few remarks, and our loco foreman, Mr. Maitland, who paid a tribute to Bro. Woolnough’s remarkable career, unmarred as it was by mishap of any description. I have not the slightest compunction in saying that those remarks were unostentatiously made and were highly appreciated and reciprocated, intermitted as they were with usual compatible humour. Our general secretary was then called upon, and touched upon bro. Woolnough’s career, together with his fine trade union record - 41 years a member of A.S.L.E. & F., and still in the harness as branch chairman. Reminiscences of the “good old days” were highly appreciated and enjoyed. In handing Bro. Woolnough the presentation from his colleagues, consisting of a gold Albert, attached to which was the chairman’s gold medal, and a sum of £8 18s., he appreciated the fact that these ceremonies were getting much more frequent, and was pleased beyond measure at the feeling of comradeship. In presenting a brooch for Mrs Woolnough, our action was highly commended, for never should the lassies be forgotten on these occasions for right through the railwayman’s career the woman is a sufferer. Bro. Woolnough was then accorded musical honours. His reply, I need hardly say, was brief, but nevertheless full of meaning.

Following, another pleasing ceremony was performed by Mr. Browing, organizing secretary of the N.U.R., by the presentation to Porter A. Putman and Mrs. Putman of a freshwater fishing outfit and an umbrella, together with a sum of money.

After according a vote of thanks to Bro. Galyer for taking the chair, and Messrs, Bromley and Browing, a very pleasant evening came to a conclusion.

W. LAWRENCE, Branch Sec.


PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

St Leonards Loco shed and turntable 


Make a free website with Yola