1882





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

6TH JANUARY 1882


The North Eastern Company have been guilty of a sharp practice in regard to recent explosion on their line. In such cases as these it is always an understood thing that if life is lost, everything should remain as near as possible in the state in which it was directly after the occurrence; but not the North Eastern Company have taken on themselves to remove the lead plug, an important witness as to whether or not the driver had been negligent. When the fire box of a Brighton Company's locomotive exploded at Lewes (1879), the engine was at once put under lock and key, but in the case of the explosion at Stockton the company have interfered with what they thought proper. Fortunately the lead plug was in a perfect state: had it not been so the officials of the company might have found themselves in an awkward predicament. The jury have already intimated, in a back handed manner, that they do not like such a proceeding, ad will probably express their feelings on the subject when they arrive at their verdict.     




LONDON BRIDGE


4th FEBRUARY 1882

On the 4th February, 1882, in dense fog two, engines Nos. 212 ‘Hartlington’ and 211 
‘Beaconsfield’ were involved in what could have been a really serious affray. The former had left London Bridge with the 4.00 p.m. Brighton express and been followed by five minutes later by No. 211 at the head of the Hastings train. No. 212 had made its way at about 20 m.p.h. towards New Cross, when the fog suddenly thickened and speed was slackened to a walking pace, until just before Bricklayers Arms Junction. There no signals could be seen so speed was reduced even further with both men searched for the fogman. Just as he was found and shouted all was clear, 211 crashed gently into the rear, its speed having been fortuitously lowered by the guard applying his brakes when he failed to sight signals. Both trains stopped, and when it was discovered that the damage was negligible and no one injured, the guards decided to couple the trains together and proceed slowly to the New Cross box. On arrival, the fog had thinned out and each could be despatched separately down the main line. 





Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


Spa Road 4th February 1882


Bricklayers Arms Junction 4th February 1882


Involving Drivers Edwin Mitchell & John Packham 

Depots not known

SEE SUB PAGE


Involving Driver George McClary

Driver John Bromley & his Harry W. Dawes 

Depots not known

SEE SUB PAGE



Railway Review 28th April 1882

Colonel Yolland has reported on three collisions occurring on this line. The collision between a passenger train and a goods engine on February 4th, near Bricklayer's Arms Junction, resulted in three persons being injured, and occurred during a fog. The traffic was consequently being worked by fogmen, but the fog was so dense that the man on duty could not see whether the signs; was off or on, except by watching the signal wire. So uncertain a method as this resulted in the fogman making a mistake as to the road, and told the driver that the road on which he was was clear. The driver again was in fault, and Colonel Holland finds that the collision was direct result of the disobedience of the order, on the part of the driver of the passenger train, that directs that when a fog signal explodes the engine driver must "instantly shut off steam, whistle for the guard's brakes, and bring his engine and train to a stand." The engine driver of the light engine also disobeyed the order respecting the fog signals, and Colonel Holland remarks that safe running during such dense fogs cannot be reckoned on unless engine drivers are made to observe the company's rules and regulations with respect to fog signals. The whole affair is a strange mixture, and strange to say Colonel Holland states that the 140 yards which there was between the point where the fog signal exploded and the point of collision was sufficient to bring the train to a stand if it had been fitted with the Westinghouse brake. For about the first tine he has paid tribute to the efficiency of this appliance.

Following on this collision another between two passenger train about an hour after the first one, through which eleven passengers were injured, and the guard had a rib fractured. It was caused by the mistake in the signalling of the trains on the part of the train clerk, combined with the fact that the company's regulations for guidance of engine drivers do not appear to have been observed in the instance by the engine driver of the Hastings train, one of the trains in collision.

On the same day a slight collision occurred between two passenger trains near Spa Road Station, but the damage done was slight, and no one was injured. The driver of the second train states that the frogman gave him the "All right" signal, but this the frogman denies, and Colonel Holland has no hesitation in saying that the driver disobeyed the order as to stopping after running over a detonator, and continuing to run forward, the collision was the direct result of his disobedience. Thus the Briton Company were singularly unfortunate on this day. They can take credit to themselves and say that their servants were to blame, but while the present system of working during a fog so dense that standing at the foot of a signal post the signal itself cannot be seen, these accidents may be expected to occur. Like all other companies the London, Brighton, and South Coast requires. to pay more attention to an effective and safe method of running trains during fog.   




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH FEBRUARY 1882

The dense fog which spread over the metropolis on Friday (3rd) and Saturday (4th), entering each room and nook in it, was a source of anxiety to those charged with working railway traffic. On the south Eastern all traffic was entirely suspended for a short time, and, with the Brighton, the South Western, and Chatham lines, experienced the thickest and longest fog experienced in London this winter. Several collision occurred between London Bridge and Spa road, and one at the Bricklayers' Arms, but thanks to the Westinghouse brake little damage was done. On the northern lines too there was considerable delay to passenger trains, while the strangers from the country alight from the trains were truly benighted -- they were lost in London. Having regard to the long continuance of the fog, and to the absence of mechanical fog signalling arrangements, the freedom from accidents is noteworthy. The goods traffic, if not suspended, was much delayed, and only partially run. The delivery of all goods was impossible, as at times horses and vans could not transverse the streets, while the clever London thieves lightened many a railway van of some of its freight. So opaque was the smoke thrown down that passengers walked off platforms, vans ran on to the street footpaths, and fog signalmen could scarcely discern the rails where signals had to be placed. On the South Eastern some of the fogmen did duty for fourteen and sixteen hours, and carriage washers and other imperfectly acquainted with signalling had to be impressed into the service to relieve the worn out plate layers. This great fog, with its locomotives and anxieties, may more influence managers in introducing mechanical appliances to do that which men now do than have deaths of hundreds (if not thousands) of poor men who have been killed when engaged in guiding trains safely through the darkness of dense fogs. The clearer weather of this week has lifted a heavy weight from the minds of the officials and workmen of London railway. Let us hope its lesson will not be forgotten.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

17TH FEBRUARY 1882

PRESENTATION TO AN OLD ENGINE DRIVER


A most gratifying presentation was made last week at the reading room, Brighton Works, to Mr. Robert Peel, who has been upwards of thirty four years an engine driver on the Brighton line, and has now been promoted to be foreman at Hastings. The presentation, over £35 in value, consisted of a handsome marble clock and vases, an 18 carat gold watch and chain and locket suitably inscribed, and was subscribed for by Mr. Peel's fellow servants. W. Stroudley, Wsq., head of Locomotive Department, made the presentation, and in the course of a few remarks said he was sure that it would be valued by the recipient. The company were glad to be able to place Mr. Peel in a position more suited to his years, and he was sure Mr. Peel, knowing the trails of his fellow men, would be able to proper advice. Mr. Peel, in returning thanks, said he had always tried to do his duties, and be kind to fellow men. He referred to the first engine he drove, and what a great difficulty he had with his work in those primitive days of railways. He was thankful to state his freedom from any scars after over forty years on the footplate. John Shaw, a fellow driver, testified to the high esteem in which Mr. Peel was held by his fellow workmen, so also did Mr. Fowler and several other drivers. Mr. Woodhead, the foreman, was very energetic in promoting the affair. The meeting adjourned, after passing a vote of thanks to the chairman and committee, to the Battle of Trafalgar to spend the remainder of the evening.  




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

24TH FEBRUARY 1882

BRIGHTON DRIVERS

Sir, A few weeks back a driver who had been out from about 4.30 on Saturday night to about 10.30 on Sunday morning on goods shunting job was booked out on the passenger relief the same day, while there were plenty of men off duty. Things are in a very unsatisfactory state here. Thirty hours at a stretch is not a strange thing at Battersea, and I have known men to work from fifteen to seventeen hours a day the through, and then he booked off the next week for it. If you can speak to any one of them about it the answer you get is that you must not say anything or "he" will be down on you, and then you know the result will be a day off oftener than you wish for. It is a very rare for a man to get a rise when it is due unless he is a favourite. He has to wait sometimes two years for it. If a fireman is a tidy favourite he will get a new engine in about four of five years; others have to wait eight or nine years to get a start at all. One man has been firing twelve years. some of our drivers getting 7s. 6d. a day do not care for those who are at the bottom of the tree, but they may at some time require the support of the younger hands. 

Yours obediently 
ONE WHO IS AFFECTED 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

3RD MARCH 1882 


A Mr. "Josh Brooke," hailing from Sweet Street, Holdbeck, Leeds, has placed his name to a circular addressed to the Locomotive Enginemen, and Firemen of Great Britain, on behalf of the executive of a society with the funny tittle of "The Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen." Among other objects this society professes is that of "protecting the representative of their employers from the insults of any foolish or ignorant members." We assume, then that the "Associated" Society has amongst its members those who are foolish and ignorant, and given to insulting foremen, superintendent, and directors. This is much to be regretted, but there is some evidence of their folly and ignorance in the fact that they subscribe their own money,  that it should be used by Mr. Brooke and his executive in protecting the foremen and superintendents -- poor helpless men -- from the insults of the members of this society. We were always of opinion that trades unions were to protect workmen, and that companies and officers were able to protect themselves; but it would seem from Mr. Brooke's circular that such is not the case, and that he and others, with much disinterested feeling, have formed a society to protect the officers -- aye, even against those subscribing members of the society whom Mr. Brooke describes as "foolish and ignorant." How many Enginemen are there who are really so foolish and ignorant as to believe that it is the province of genuine enginemen's trades unions to protect their employers against enginemen, or who would entrust the cause of their labour to men who try to impose such trashy sentiments on their class? The arrogance of the language used is an insult to every locomotive man.     



THE RAILWAY REVIEW

3RD MARCH 1882

LONDON, BRIGHTON AND SOUTH COAST
ENGINEMEN AND FIREMEN 

A meeting was held at the Duke of Cornwall, Stewart's Lane, Battersea, on Sunday last, to consider matters in connection with their duties. Owing to want of notice there was but a small attendance. It is proposed to hold the next meeting in the Enginemen's room at Battersea on Sunday next.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON MEN AT BATTERSEA 

Sir, I have read with much pleasure the remarks of "One who is Affect." Things at Battersea want a great deal of altering, but I am inclined to think that want is our share, for we cannot trust each other. 
Some men are always running after the gaffer, and other pass him by; some cannot keep away from the public house that he uses, others will not enter it. 
We have men who are honest in their intentions, but there are not enough of them. 
We are surrounded by men who cheer us to our face, and then run to the foreman, telling him all we have said. He listens to this. 
Some men have had two or three new engines within the last three years, and they are all young hands; others get one instead of a rise of wages. 
Some men have had to wait two or three years for a rise, whilst others get two or three rises in that time. 
Some have few money, but they have a new engine on the main line and come right somehow. 
Some men fire seven or eight years, others about three or four; some fire nearly all their time on one engine and one job, others are all other the shop. 
Some have all passenger work and others all goods.
Lately with started a lad out of the shed firing on the main line, and running the Pullman car train. What would have been the result had the driver fallen off the engine? The lad had not learnt the road, and it would have been rather rough for the responsible for the appointment.
Some of the cleaners have been working for years on 1s. 4d. and 2s. per day, and do quite as much work as those who have 2s. 6d. They have been promised more than a dozen times, as well as the drivers and firemen, that they should have fair pay. 
Some of the fancy men have a part of their tenders painted as often as they like; some have the painter twice a week; and with others, their engine may go back before they are touched.
Then there is always something to take the money out of our pockets.
We have raffles, draws, fetes, galas, the tailor, watch clubs, photographs, &c., and there is a prospect that we shall soon be provided with pork.
Old drivers ask us why we don't belong to any clubs? How can we, when we are compelled to support everything that is got up at the place. If we are amongst drivers and firemen on other lines, the cry is "How much did you pay for your job?" or they say to each other, "Mind what you say, you don't know who is at Battersea." 
So, you see, we are a happy family at Battersea, we are! we are! we are!

Yours obediently 
ANOTHER WHO IS AFFECTED 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH MARCH 1882


We respectfully call the attention of Mr. J.P. Knight, of Mr. Stroudley, and the directors of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway to a letter signed "Another who is Affected," which we published elsewhere. We have been at pains to exclude all that the write has said which might be construed to be personally libellous. but so much remains which, if true, is discreditable to the good name of the Brighton Company, that we trust inquiry will be made into some of the allegations, and a check put on practices which will not bear the light of day. If it be that officers are making profit or advantages for themselves by mean of power or position entrusted to them, and do so at the cost of the workmen, who for the sake of favour, promotion, or the retention of their situations submit to a system of blackmail, there must be injustice perpetrated in the name of the Brighton Company. The allegations of our correspondent are not new, nor made now for the first time. They are old enough, and have made the Brighton locomotive department a byword among the enginemen of other companies. Foremen have the right, we assume, to be managers of portrait clubs, watch clubs, and agents of music halls proprietors, but we doubt their right to use their superior position and the time and premises of the company to make a profit for themselves or others out of the men under them, and by reason of their influence over them. We have much confidence in Mr. Knight and in Mr. Stroudley. These gentlemen would not knowingly have anything improper continued with their knowledge. We therefore withhold further comment, in the belief that some inquiry will be made, and that the truth of the relationship of certain officers with the workmen will be laid bare and the evils spoken of discontinued.    




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH MARCH 1882

ENGINEMEN'S TRADE UNIONS

The difficulties of maintaining or continuing a locomotive men's exclusive trade union, even when successfully floated, have never yet been overcome. Ir would seem as though circumstances constantly operate in proving to enginemen and firemen that as they do not stand alone, are not isolated in their work, so they cannot stand alone in a labour protection society, which excludes from membership those men in our grades who are closely mixed up with them in their daily duty. When believe that at one time of its existence the old "Enginemen and Firemen's Friendly Society" was a trade union, and after the Eastern Counties Railway strike it so amended its rules as to alter the union into a passive friendly society. Several attempts to form enginemen's unions were made up to 1866 without success. In that year the "Engine Drivers and Firemen's United Society" was established, but it utterly collapsed in the succeeding year on the occasion of the North Eastern driver's strike. In 1879 an attempt was to establish the "National Union of Enginemen and Firemen," rules were drawn up, officers appointed, and many branches opened throughout England and Wales. The "National Union" is, however, now dead. another effort began at the same time, under the queer tittle of the "Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers, &c. "from the insults" of the "foolish" drivers and firemen who became members of this "Associated Society." We anticipate that this society will soon end in a collapse and division of funds. A far greater failure than any is, however, that of the American "Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers." A few years since and this trade union was dreaded by all American railroad companies. It is now harmless life insurance society, taking no part in questions of hours and wages, but is, on the contrary, patronised by the companies. for a mess of pottage they have parted with a trade union's birthright -- independence. All these failures of trade unions, projected for exclusive use of enginemen and firemen, are in strange contrast to the continuance in unity of thousands of enginemen and firemen in the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, which admits regularly appointed men in every grade to the privileged of membership. The Amalgamated Society counts a greater number of enginemen and firemen among its members than of any other single class, and a greater number too, than has ever belonged to any exclusive enginemen's trade union in this country. The fact is that the majority of enginemen who favour unity, see in a combination of all grades of railway servants the greatest possible protection and unity, a ready means of fostering goodwill between men in different classes, and a check on the precipitate or ill considered inclination of any one class to enter on strikes or disputes. guided by the experience of history we can but conclude that the foundation on which Amalgamated Society is built up is the only enduring one, and the most congenial and suitable to the inclinations and interests of enginemen and firemen.  





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

17TH MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON MEN AT BATTERSEA 

On Wednesday morning a deputation of three engine driver from Battersea called the Review Office, and courteously request the insertion of the following account of a largely attended meeting held at Battersea on the previous evening. We readily consented to carry out their wish. Certain immaterial alterations have been made in the account, with the consent of the deputation, so as to avoid using the names of persons in a manner that might be regarded by them as invidious, and for the sake of accuracy. The deputation thanked us for the kindly manner in. which they had been received, and withdrew. it is evident that the letter of "Another who is Affected," which we published lat week, is causing some commotion among the Battersea enginemen.

"A meeting of drivers and firemen employed on the London, Brighton, and South coast Railway, Battersea district, was held on Tuesday night. Owing to the great number attending it was found impossible to hold the meeting at first arranged, viz., in the Enginemen's room, and accordingly it was adjourned to one of the larger workshops adjoining the works. Mr. J. Taylor was voted to the chair, and the following resolutions were unanimously carried:-

" 1. That this meeting having heard the letter signed by 'Another who is Affected' read which appeared in the Railway Review of March 10th, concerning our officials at Battersea, desires to express its condemnation at the writer's wicked and malicious attempt to break that good and harmonious feeling which has so long existed between our officers and ourselves, and regrets that it should have appeared without the write's name.

" 2. That this meeting desires to return to the officers, our heartfelt thanks for the many kindnesses we have received, and sincerely hopes that the good feeling that has existed for so many years may still continue to do so.

" 3. That an humble address signed by this meeting and all other hands be presented to the foreman showing our sympathy with him, and at our horror and disgust that the letter in question should have been written.

" 4. That the deputation be chosen from the meeting consisting of J. Taylor, S. Cook, E. McKew, C. Todman, and G. Goldspring, to wait upon the district superintendent and ask his acceptance of a copy of these resolutions.

" 5. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to The Railway Review, asking for the insertion of the in their next issue. "

- - - - - - 

The letter of "Another Who is Affected" was the cause of a largely attended meeting of locomotive men at Battersea, on Tuesday, when a series of five resolutions, which we published elsewhere, were agreed to. A perusal of the resolutions show them to be so many flattering compliments conveyed to certain officers named by the meeting; they do not enlighten us as to the truth or falsehood of the allegations made by "Another Who is Affected," nor demand that inquiry should be made into them for the sake of the staff and the company.

Under the circumstances nothing was easier than to ensure a good meeting for the purpose of saying pleasing things of officers who wield power over those attending it. Such an opportunity does not appeal except negativity to the better qualities of the men. Many would attend it know that the pleasant things said would be reported to the officers, other would attend because their absence might be construed into an approval of the offending letter, and even the write of it may have been expected that the recipients of favour (if any exist) would openly accuse themselves by so; nor would the aggrieved men run the risk of discharging by using the meeting to express their sentiments. As to the expressed opinion that the writer should have attached his name to the letter, we ask how many of those who voted that opinion have the courage at this moment to append their names to a published letter calling in question the management of the line or of any department in it?

Not one resolution attempts to rebut a single allegation contained in the letter, and it never seems to have entered the minds of those at the meeting that a strict and impartial inquiry is as desirable for their own good names, as it is for the credit of the administration of the Brighton line. No amount of flattery will aid in ascertaining the truth of the matter, nor decrease by one iota the weight of the charges made. We should have felt proud of the meeting and of those who convened it had they assembled to give straightforward denial on their part to the statements of "Another Who is Affected," and in proof of their own innocence and of their belief in the high character of the officials have demanded a searching inquiry at the hands of Mr. Stroudley or the directors. If the letter was worth such notice as has been given to it, then it was incumbent that its contents should be refuted, and that the doings at Battersea should be proved to be always aboveboard and unobjectionable. Unless this was done, why notice it all? 

We can but regret the course taken by those who convened this meeting some of whom we believe to be incapable of stopping to any unworthy act. The omissions mentioned by us are apt to create prejudice, and it may be, give colour to statements long enough bandied about from mouth to mouth. If they are untruthful, these statements should receive their death blow in the only possible way, i.e., by the denial of impartial inquirers who have sifted the matter thoroughly. On the other hand, if any practices prevail which are not discreet or fair, and in consequence create feelings of jealously, or ill will, or of unfairness among the staff, it is to the advantage of every one that they should be revealed and forbidden. The application of the caustic which lays bare and removes the impurity concealed beneath the skin, though painful, is a kindly operation. The meeting of Tuesday reminds us of the conduct of the victorious electors of a certain constituency in which intimidation was alleged by their friends of the defeated candidate. They convened a meeting and adopted an address setting forth the many virtues and excellencies of their representative, imagining that they had thus imagining that they had thus effectually answered and disposed of the accusations of their opponents. "We cannot," said the opponents, "accept your decision as a disinterested one, therefore we have determined to have an inquiry whereat you as well as ourselves shall reveal all we know, and others not directly concerned in our actions give their judgement on the evidence." This was done, and the successful candidate ceased to be the member for the constituency.

These resolutions of Tuesday are not answer to the letter of "Another Who is Affected." The question still remains open: Has the writer told the truth, or has he maligned the Brighton locomotive department? Those who care to avail themselves of our columns can do so, whatever views they take. We have no side beyond an earnest desire to serve the cause of truth, and by it to ensure equitable treatment and good relations between officers and men on the Brighton and other lines.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

17TH MARCH 1882

THE BRIGHTON MEN AT BATTERSEA 

Sir, Those men at Battersea who keep  on grumbling about their mates being so much better off than they are, are a great deal to blame themselves. If they would look after their own interests they would be a great deal better off. As for them to talk about what they have to pay to all those "get ups," that is all moonshine. If a man had any love for his wife and family, he would belong to some good Society, and look out for a rainy day; he would have one of the best excuses that man can have for not contributing. Let all those grumblers join the railwaymen's Society and attend the meetings; it will be the means of making them more friendly, and then all these little bickering will pass away and each will try to work for one another's good. All will then go on smoothly, and the work will be done with pleasure.

Yours obediently
A WELL WISHER TO ALL 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

24TH MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON ENGINEMEN AT BATTERSEA 

We find that the meeting held at Battersea last week was not quite correctly described in correctly described in the report furnished to us by its promoters. The "great number" attending described as "enginemen and firemen" was not made up exclusively of those grade, but partly of cleaners, washers out, fire lighters, and the sundry men employed at engine sheds. A second notice calling the meeting justified the attendance of these employees, though the first notice posted up invited only enginemen and firemen. We learn, too, from independent source that an enginemen who took a prominent part in the proceedings at the Battersea meeting, in a conversation with a South Western driver on the Sunday preceding, declared the statements of "Another Who is Affected" to be quite right, but hot." One driver, with profuse zeal that a certain officer should know the author of the letter, professed his willingness to give £5 for the information. the offer shows that he who makes it believes in the power of bribery, or else that he considers his £5 safe, and makes the offer as a cheap and easy effort of winning favour. Other profess to know the author. for our part, we doubt if any one has so much as suspected the actual author. The knowledge we posses in this respect is sacred; but should Mr. Stroudley order an inquiry, we think that "Another Who is Affected" will then consent to stand forward and give evidence in support of his statements. Some other minor stories reach us, too, about fowls and pigsties since the letter referred to appeared, but they are not worthy of our notice.

They were other matters mentioned which, if true, seriously affect the men and their relation with officers, and which are worthy of the strictest inquiry by those who value the reputation of the official staff for just and impartial administration. The deputation of last week assured us that whatever was done in the matter of concerts was the outcome of generosity, and of desire to aid widows and others in distress. We are ready to believe that if any official influence whatever has been used to promote the success of such entrainments, the indirection was the outcome of a kindly regard for those labouring under misfortune, and was not prompted by any personal motives. Let us consider more practical matters. In 1872 the directors made concessions in hours and wages to the locomotive men. they embodied in a scale of rates of wages to be paid to drivers and firemen, which provided, among other things, for gradual promotion to increase pay. First, we would inquire, "Have the terms of this scale been equitably and without favour adhered to at Battersea?" rises in pay have, of course, been made constantly, but not with punctuality nor with equality." It is assert that some men have received their advances immediately they were due, or shortly afterwards, while others, equally as competent and attentive to duty have been kept out of their due promotion for months together. Why has this distinction been made between men equally entitled to the benefits accorded to all by the directors? Why has the good faith of the directors been kept with some, broken with others, and make subservient to the favour of officers? The intuitive in granting advances rests with Battersea in so far as Battersea district men are concerned, and if the assertions made are accurate, then the reason for the different treatments named can only be given by officials of the district. We hear, and give it our readers simply as hearsay, that since this discussion in The Review began a large number of rises which were overdue have been entered on the list for transmission to Brighton. How it is that official business of this sort becomes matter of conversation outside the charmed official circle is itself matter for investigation.

Then, again, as to the disposal of engines and duties. It is alleged that the system of disposal is not one regulated by merit and servitude, as is usual on most railways. Mr. Stroudley has provided some excellent engines, while he is, of course, bound to use out the earlier stock. A good engine enables the driver to figure low in the consumption returns, to keep time, it is better looked after, and easier to keep tidy and clean. All these points are highly valued by drivers, because they tend to make duty more pleasant and easy. Hence they think in the matter of engines that seniority should be give the preference, all other qualities being equal. It is said that this is not always so at Battersea, but the young hands are sometimes favoured at the expense of those more experienced. Why should this be so? We need say little as to the bearing of the class of train or duty men are booked for. It affects the length and character of their work, and the amount of money they receive each week. It is importance that those who regulate these matters should be animated by strict impartiality , and that they should be above the suspicion of being unduly influenced to favouritism. it is alleged that a short time since on driver on the Pullman trains was given a shed day more frequently than the others. The latter complained of the disparity in treatment, and for doing so were punished by being booked off a day per week without wages, instead of having the usual shed day.

There is little doubt that men who have merited punishment are apt to express their disappointment by unfair and unjust criticism on those who administered the punishment, and perhaps some of the stories told of Battersea may be put down to such a source. There is, however, a wide belief that influences have been at work which, to say the least, would not receive the approval of Mr. Stroudley or the directors. We have no wish to join in this belief, but, on the contrary, contend that in the interviews of the men and of those responsible for the administration of the locomotive department impartial inquiry is desirable. We content ourselves with again urging on those in authority to institute inquiry, and relieve the Brighton line from the reproaches which come from within and from without its circle.      




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

24TH MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON MEN AT BATTERSEA 

Sir, With regard to the first part of the letter signed "Another Who is Affected" I have nothing to say, as I do not belong to the "happy family," but the latter part of the letter, referring to benefits, fetes, &c., appears to me to be an expression of personal disappointment and jealously, and is, further, a confession that the writer, and all those who agree with his sentiments, are men with very little independence in them, who, in order to obtain some favour from the hands of their superior officers, purchase tickets for the above against their own inclination. Your correspondence says "we are compelled to belong to everything that is got up," but he does not say in what way the compulsion is enforced. Again, his letter is misleading, as it might be inferred that these fetes, &c., are got up for benefits of the officials themselves; in fact, you appear to have drawn this inference yourself, as you allude to the officials as agents for music hall proprietors.

Now, sir, the fact is that the only "fetes and galas" which have been held at Battersea have been in aid of the Railway Servants' Orphanage; and I believe the other concerts, &c., which have been in any way promoted by the officers at Battersea have been for the benefit of widows and orphans of deceased railwaymen, or for men in distressed circumstances; and if their mates have given their support with no better motive than to keep in favour with the officials, it is a great pity that they had not the courage to withhold it together. In conclusion, I assure you that I am perfectly disinterested in the matter, and only desire that no injustice may be done either to officers or men.

Your obediently 
Outsider
(Our correspondent was hardly "disinterested" in the fate of the fetes he refers to. 
ED. R.R.)




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

24TH MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON LOCOMOTIVE MEN 
AT NEW CROSS

Sir, We must give our head official at New Cross his due, for there is no buying about him. I think it would be rather a queer job for anyone if they were to try such a thing on; but we have to complain very much of the long hours drivers and firemen work on nearly all the jobs at New Cross. The goods men work sixteen, seventeen, and twenty one hours at a stretch, and are close at home, so that it would no difficulty to relieve them. We have asked for relief, and are told we are to work these long  hours and then have a day off. Drivers and firemen on the East London line work sixteen and eighteen hours where eight hours are plenty, considering the way we have to keep going, leaving out the beastly smells we have to contend with, and the heat of the engine footplate. If the men want to get any air they must stand outside, for the windows on the engines are are not made to open. It would;d be a great benefit to the men they were. On the four wheel coupled passenger tank jobs one week we to work sixteen and seventeen hours every day, so that it is all sleep and work. If this is done in winter what shall we have to do in the summer? I have known men to work 115 hours in one week, and if they ask for relief the cry is we have not a man to spare. If the overtime was made little more expensive to the company there would soon be something done. Men are beginning to think they have something to live for besides sleep and work. We are compelled to belong to the Superannuation Fund, and cannot received any benefit until we are sixty years of age. I do not think many drivers will live to enjoy the benefit if they work these long hours. If Mr. Stroudley knew of this I am sure he would make some alteration.

Yours Obediently,
New Cross      




AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF RAILWAY SERVANT 

Founded 1871

1913 amalgamated to become the National Union of Railwaymen

In 1872 branches of the A.S.R.S. were formed on the L.B.S.C.R., these branches included Enginemen and railwaymen from all the various railway grades within the L.B.S.C.R.

NEWHAVEN

Date of first members being recorded on the 26th March 1882
SEE SUB PAGE





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

31ST MARCH 1882


It is matter of surprise that no one of those present at the meeting at Battersea on the 14th inst. has undertaken the task of refuting, by facts and arguments, the statement of "One Who is Affected." There are many competent scribes on the Brighton line at Battersea capable, if disposed, of the charge in our columns this week, and gives, if that were necessary, a further proof of the desirability for the impartial inquiry of which we have previously spoken. In the meantime it is given out that more over due advances have been reached Mr. Stroudley. Many driver and firemen will certainly owe their rises to the influence of The Railway Review. Of that there will not be two opinions. We regret to think that any officers on the Brighton line should have undone an obvious act of justice till forcibly reminded of it in our columns. 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

31ST MARCH 1882

BRIGHTON MEN AT BATTERSEA

Sir, I have read the letter of "A Well-wisher to All," but Iw cannot agree with him. In fact, I don't think he understood the letter of "Another Who is Affected." He says that what the men have to pay to the gets up is all moonshine. There is no moonshine about it. The officials referred to come to you and say, "How many tickets do you want?" not "Can you take a ticket for the affair?" Your correspondent says let all these grumblers join the Railwaymen's Society, and attend the meetings. How does he know that the men don't belong to the Society? Does he know that meetings are a dreadful thing to attend for men at Battersea? Does he know that the men were called over the coals for going to the meeting at the Duke of Cornwall? My opinion is that the letter of "Another Who is Affected" would never have been written if the men had been let alone. With reference to "Outsider," there are lots of them who belong to the happy family, and are the happiest part of it too. I think that our fetes and concerts seem to affect him a great deal; in fact, there are a few outsiders who do well with our "gets up," as they are called, and he too want to know how we are compelled to belong to these things. This I have explained. "Outsider" is like some of the rest who have any say about our affairs; he only mentions the fetes and concerts; he says nothing about the raffles or the Christmas draws. He says the concert are for men in distressed circumstances. Does he mean the tradesmen? if so, he ought to be downright ashamed of himself. I must give "Another Who is Affected" his due. He gives it hot all round, and what is more, he speaks the truth. And now about our horror and disgust. I should like to know what some people will be horrified at next. If they are horrified at the truth, they will be at anything. And then why did the chairman call a meeting of all hands? Is this what the drivers and firemen at Battersea have come to -- obliged to have shed sweepers, washers out, fire fighter, and all sorts, to fight their battles? Is it the same on other lines? The least that those men who came for the writer's name could have done was to speak the truth. Dozens of men were saying the meeting would be put down as drivers and firemen, but I don't believe that twenty four of them were there. The three men who went to the office thought they had done wonders, but they were mistaken, for many of the men who voted for those resolutions voted just for the sake of saying so, but they voted against their own conscience. A few men could not leave off expressing their horror and disgust, they were so cut up in their way. The driver who told the South Western man the letter was quite right but hot, while at the meeting was calling out "shame, shame." If the truth is known he is calling out shame now. The shed sweeper seconded these resolutions! Of course when the humble address comes round for us to sign our names to express our sympathy, we shall all rush to get our names down first; but mind you, the only straightforward men will be those who refuse to have anything to do with it. Lots of men and boys have had rises since the first letter came out, and you see it was not written in vain, and more rises are coming, so you see there was something wrong. There are many who will never know perhaps who to thank for it. Let us hope that we shall go on better now. All the men want is justice and no favour, and justice was properly carried out, would soon bring these favourite men to their proper senses.

Yours obediently 
One of the Happy Family 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

11TH APRIL 1882


The charges which have been made against the management of the locomotive department of the Brighton line at Battersea are in a fair way of being forgotten. The address decided on at the mixed meetings in the coppersmith's sop has been signed by ninety two out the ninety four employed at Battersea, and, of the two have not signed one is ill and the other is away. The unanimity in this matter is neither greater nor any less than expected. If there had been any cause for complaint, the complaining parties would not probably have had sufficient independence to refrain from signing, so that address does not prove or disprove anything. Some good has resulted, and if in the future there is a greater regard to the paying of the advance of wages when they become due, "Another Who is Affected" will have some cause of satisfaction in taking the course he did.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

11TH APRIL 1882

IMPROVEMENTS AT BRIGHTON

The reorganisation of the system of working the traffic at Brighton Station has rendered necessary the erection of a large signal houses, and intricate locking apparatus. Large subways are now being being built beneath the various roads, which will form galleries for the conveyance of point rods. Space will be left for men to pass along and execute any repairs without running the danger to which they are exposed above surface.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

5TH MAY 1882

BRIGHTON 

NINE HOUR MOVEMENT MEETING

A meeting referred to in our last impression was held on Sunday afternoon, the 23rd ult., in Ginnett's Circus, Lewes Road, to promote the extension of the nine hours system. Nearly three hundred persons directly interested in the movement attended, and several local gentlemen who sympathised with the objects sought to be attained were also present. A driver occupied the chair, and the meeting having been opened, Mr. W.C. Herbert (in the absence of the travelling secretary, Mr. E. Harford) delivered an address on the objects of the society, and explained the manifesto of the railway servants' nine hours movement. That movement had, he said, been for some time before railway servants and the public, and the justice of it required no comment. It had become proverbial that railwaymen were the worst paid and the most overworked class of operatives in the country, and the results of the overwork were injured health, absence of the opportunities to self culture, and the deprivation of those domestic and social efforts which all men had a right to demand. Life under such circumstances was little better than penal servitude, and he called upon all present to unite with the society, and so to bring their collective influence to bear upon the movement. The Rev. Father Fletcher then proposed a resolution pledging the meeting to forward the nine hours movement, and in course off a humours and interesting speech expressed his entire sympathy with the program of the society, and also with the time at which the meeting had been called. He could not for the life him understand why people should object to attend a meeting of this kind on a Sunday; the object was a good one, and as railway servants ministered greatly to the needs and comforts of the public, the public should support them in their effort to remove the grievance under which they undoubtedly laboured. The motion was seconded and carried unanimously, as was also resolution, moved by Mr. Councilor Bond and seconded by Mr. H. Prince urging all railway servants to join the society. Votes of thanks to Mr. Ginnett for the use if the circus, to the speakers for their addresses, and to the chairman for presiding, terminated the proceedings. Another meeting in connection withe society was held in the evening at the New England Inn. 




Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.



London Bridge 19th May 1882

Railway Review 30th June

Colonel Yolland states that this collision, which occurred on May 19th between a passenger train and a carriage truck close to the buffer on No.1 passenger line, was entirely due to the carelessness of the driver in not having looked out for and being guided by two sets of signals, which were placed at the entrance of the station for his guidance, and for having turned on the steam of his engine to go ahead when he was not more than five yards from the carriage truck in front of his engine. 




 LONDON BRIDGE


19th MAY 1882

On the 19th May, 1882 engine No. 304 “Nice”, which came into collision with an empty 
carriage truck at London Bridge while running into platform 1 with the 6.20p.m. from 
Tunbridge Wells. The damage to the engine was slight, but the truck shattered and the 
platform edge made unsafe for some twenty-five yards. The Fireman and two passengers 
complained of bruising, while a third passenger claimed compensation for a diamond lost 
from a valuable ring and unnoticed in the confusion. A hurried search the following morning by a skeptical inspector of the first-class accommodation surprisingly discovered the missing stone wedged between two cushions.





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

19TH MAY 1882

I suppose we shan't hear anything more about Battersea for some time to come, but I hope you will let me say that without asking I have received a rise in wages which I was entitled to three years ago" Strange that a man who was so strongly condemned as the writer of the first letter dealing with the London, Brighton, and South Coast locomotive men at Battersea should have brought about not only this, but should have secured the advances of wages due to about seventy men. It is not as if these were only just due: a month even may not call for any notice, but when these advances are withheld for a period varying from three months to three years, the matter presents a very different appearance. On whom does the responsibility of this rest?   




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

7TH JULY 1882

THE PRINCE OF WALES ON THE WRONG LINE

It started that a singular occurrence happened on the return to the Prince of Wales from Hastings on Monday week. The Prince's special was, of course, bound for Victoria, but at the junction above Croydon the pointsman turned the Royal special on to the London Bridge line. The train proceeded onwards for some little distance, until the driver of the train discovered that he was on the wrong line. He therefore stopped the train and shunted it on to the proper line of railway. This is the second time within a few months that such an occurrence has happened to a distinguished traveller. The Arch Bishop of Canterbury, going up to town, was carried along the London Bridge line by mistake, and it was not till the train had gone nearly to Forest Hill that the mistake was found out




NEW RAILWAY LINES TO EAST GRINSTEAD

On the 1st August 1882 the Lewes to East Grinstead line was opened with the Horsted 

Keynes to Haywards Heath opening on the 3rd September 1883.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

4TH AUGUST 1882

THE BRIGHTON MEN'S OUTING

The employees in the Brighton Railway shed, to the number of thirty five, had their outing on Saturday, the 22nd, at the Black Rabbit, Arundel. Mr. F. Bird occupied the chair, and Mr. S. Moreley, the vice. After ample justice had been done to the good things, they took a drive through the beautiful park, returning by an early train in the evening, highly pleased with the arrangements so ably carried out by Messrs. G. Blanch and S Morley.





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

4TH AUGUST 1882

COLLISION ON A LINE IN COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION.

On Tuesday two trains collided in the tunnel underlying Riddlesdown Common on the line now being made from Croydon in connection with the L., B., and S.c. Railway. Thirteen of the men employed by the contractor, Mr. Firbanks, were conveyed to the Croydon Infirmary, some of them being very seriously injured.


4TH AUGUST 1882

THE COLLISION ON THE NEW LINE TO EAT GRINSTEAD.

The collision referred to in our last issue occurred, it appears, between a ballast train and a train containing navvies who were just entering work. it is said that one of the trains was late, and there was no light on either engine. Two engines were completely smashed, and the trucks much damaged, while ten of the men were injured. Their names are 
James Philips, George Burton, Henry Rogers, Albert Fitchett, George Turner, Thomas Lucas, all navvies of Croydon;
Thomas Doughty, engine driver; Alfred Burgess and Mark Lamb, firemen. The two last named were very dangerously injured. Burgess was thrown of the engine and back among the trucks, and Lamb was severely scalded.  




RAILWAY REVIEW

25TH AUGUST 1882

ACCIDENT TO AN EXCURSION TRAIN

A slight accident occurred at Polegate on the return journey of the Hastings and Eastbourne weekly excursion on Sunday. The train from Hastings divides at Polegate, part going on to Victoria and part to London Bridge. While a portion of the train was being pushed over the points to join the other part, whose destination was London Bridge, half a dozen of the carriages went off the line, causing a delay of about three quarters of an hour. Eventually the excursionists were conveyed to their destination without further mishap. None of the passengers were injured. 



RAILWAY REVIEW

25TH AUGUST 1882


Fellow railwaymen, Those of you who have been long in the railway service might usefully spend a few minutes in throwing back your memories to the years when there was no independent society like the Amalgamated to advocate the cause of railway workmen. contrast that time with the present, and say the lot of the railway servant better then or not! I  say now, notwithstanding that some of the concessions secured by the early unity and agitations conducted by the society have been taken away because you had become disunited. Recall the hours men once were worked, the wages they were paid, the little overtime that found its way on to the pay sheet, the treatment meted out by officers, the clothing supplied, and the conditions under which work had to be done, and then compare them one by one with what prevails now. The improvement is mainly due to the existence of the society and its never-ceasing influence; to the opportunity it has constantly presented to the men of freely making known their wants and their grievances, and thus enabling, nay sometimes even forcing, managers and directors to give consideration to the views of their workmen.

It has been of great advantage to managers as well as to workmen that an agency has existed speaking directly to them, the men's actual views unfiltered by biassed official channels, and undeterred by fear of intermediate disfavour or anger.

The day was when enginemen and firemen were not paid as well time for time, when greatcoats were unknown to them, when cabs on engines were a curiosity, when promotion was irregular, uncertain, and ofttimes the results of favour, and even of purchases by bribes, when overtime pay was haphazard, when Sunday was as a week day, when the foreman could, with impunity, be a bully if so disposed, when a driver's interest at an inquest or Board of Trade inquiry was at the mercy. of any department, when no regard was paid to the men's right to rest, and when the signalman and the guard was regarded as natural enemies of locomotive men. Gradually, and without violent disputes, the changes for the better have come about, but that are the result of a constant influence operating little by little on the minds of superintendents and officers. Goods guards and brakemen were, before the days of the society, seven days a week men, and often times worked 90 and 100 hours for a lesser week's wages than now they receive. Overtime was unrecognised; their duties were extremely dangerous, owing to the conditions they work under. Payment was fortnightly, and promotion uncertain. They are now regarded as six days men; there is some recognised limit to their weekly duty, beyond which they are paid extra; there is regularity in the round of duty. They have less station work, and they do it under safer conditions; there are vans to all trains, and stoves for warmth in all vans. Their wages reach them weekly, and are greater in amount,

The signalmen have made some strides, too, though nothing like what they could have made had they united better. Overtime, eight-hour boxes, ten hour boxes, relief men, Sundays at home, wages of 24s., 26s., and 28s. paid weekly, the concentration of levers in elevated boxes, are more or less innovations of the right kind that were not common till the advent of the society.

It would be easy to show that concessions to other grades like shunters, yardmen, passenger men, passenger guards, goods men, plate layers, carmen, &c., date within the time which has known the Amalgamated Society, nor would it be difficult to associate every concession with its exertions and the movements and thoughts it has fostered. I am content here to contend that the organisation of the union, with its power of bringing again and again to the minds of those in authority, and to the attention of public opinion, the demands of railwaymen, has secured for their demands a consideration and an attention that otherwise they would never have received; and where their claims to concessions.

In the old days an inquest on a railwayman was the most formal matter. An official attended, read a rule, asserted the deceased met his death by infringing that rule, and so the affair ended. No one dreamt of the right of the men or their relatives to representation. A long battle at coroners' inquiries has change the procedure. Men are now represented as a matter of course, and searching inquiries into causes are made, and are often, I am glad to say, followed by improvements which prevent others falling victims through like causes. The same remark applies to men concerned in fatal accidents. They are no longer made the scapegoat of the omissions or negligence of management without effective protest if they care to protect their rights. Once on a day a Board of trade inquiry -- except the inspecting officer was far sighted and sternly impartial like Sir Henry Tyler -- was of doubtful value and of more doubtful impartiality. The workmen were supposed to have no interest in the result, though their whole future might be affected by it. Thanks, however, to the society, railwaymen are no longer "things" at the companies' disposal; their interest in inquiries is recognised by the Board of Trade, and those men who wish it can be represented at inquiries which affect them. The cause of truth and safety is thus better served.

The society's splendid service in the accident and compensation controversies led the companies to manifest more than usual concern in the Provident and Insurance Societies of their workmen, and one result has been that the grants made by directors to these societies are increased by £30,000 per annum.

On whatever point my readers care to contrast the service as it was with the service as it is, they will find that the society's existence has. had a beneficial effect that even in its weakest stage has exercised a moral influence on the conduct of the companies and their officers towards the rank and file. Moral forces cannot be treated with indifference or contempt by the strongest, and had you are non members helped to sustain the society by joining yourselves to it, its force in the cause of justice reform would have been more widely and more readily admitted by your employers. I do not think that railway companies are either better or worse employers than are other corporations. They have great power, the command of much wealth, and are never harassed by that keen sense of responsibility to workmen, or conscientiousness, which is a mark trait in many individual employers. Frequently a director will impose terms on workmen of a railway company which he would not for a moment think of enforcing on workmen in his own employment. Thus we have directors who refuse to railway servants a ten hours' limit to the day's work, while in their private employment there are hundreds of workmen to whom they have conceded a day of nine hours' limit. Boards of directors have small consciences. They are matter of fact bodies, bent on managing immense commercial enterprises with almost a sole regard to profit. Managers who advise them are deeply interested in economy for their own credit's sake, and ofttimes for their own pocket's sake. They both come to regard workmen as part of a huge working machine, necessary to it as is the engine or carriage, but, like the latter, to be obtained at the lowest cost, and retained with the least trouble. They are, however, not slow to realise the power which workmen wield when united together for a common purpose. They respect power because it can affect their plans, and they would rather meet it with conciliation than risk the chance of loss arising from a conflict with it.

Why will not railwaymen attain to a position commanding the respect of the companies, which is within their easy reach? They have but to agree to unite, to make the smallest regular sacrifice, and a common bond gives them a giant strength. Indifference, selfishness, and jealously are the hindrances to greater union. not one of these qualities can assist you in life, though each of them, directly or indirectly, injures you and retards your progress. Try and put them one and all aside, and be truer men to yourselves and to one another.

Workmen have ever found in unity the one way to advancement, and through centuries it has been their armour and their sword. It has freed them from serfdom, raised them to be citizens and freemen, helped them in struggled against unequal and oppressive laws, emancipated them from social inequality, and and assured for them political power, despite the most strenuous opposition of the opulent of the land. It is to unity you, my fellow railwaymen, must look, if you would be of those who run in the race of progress, and are bent on winning respect and a full return for their wealth producing labour. The Amalgamated Society of railway Servants opens the way for a general union of all railway workers, and always invites you within its fold. 

I am, yours faithfully
Fred W. Evans
 




  Brighton Driver William Love 

is seen standing on the Brighton loco turntable

William Love in 1877 is listed as a Engine driver at the age of 39, was to be the first Engine driver of a B1 class No. 214 Gladstone, which is now preserved in the  N.R.M. at York by the "Stephenson locomotive Society", with his name immortalised in the cabin in the L.B.S.C.R. tradition.
No. 214 Gladstone entered service in 1882 and was withdrawn from service in December 1926, the engine ran 1,346918 


William Love was William Stroudley's (Brighton's Locomotive Superintendent 1870-89) senior driver who accompanied Stroudley 's last prize winner, "B1 class No.189 Edward Blount" to Paris in 1889.

(William Stroudley died whilst attending the Paris Exhibition of 1889)
William Love used to tell the story, that whilst standing by his engine waiting to be signaled to his train, when Stroudley come along and asked: "How is it Love, that you always run through Haywards Heath without taking water?" Love replied "that he always started off with a cold tender." Stroudley paused for a moment, struck his umbrella on the footplate, and exclaimed "Of course, I didn't think of that! You do not expand your water by heating it!” 

It was a custom of drivers to heat their water by knocking the steam back into the tender, consequently they did not start off with so much water owing to it being expanded by heating it. 


extracted from an article by A.G.Ewens 
that appeared in the Southern Railway magazine 
March/April 1942





RAILWAY REVIEW

15TH SEPTEMBER 1882

A WORD FROM BRIGHTON


Sir, The monthly meeting was held at the club house last Sunday, when the usual number of members attended. The minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. A lively discussion took place respecting the delegate to the annual general meeting, travelling secretaries, and alteration of the rules re Orphan Fund. I for one would hail with delight the alteration, but I there is a great difference of opinion among us. Many think it would cause a loss of members, as did the Superannuation Fund. Now, sir, I maintain it would be a great incentive for others to join us (the signalmen, for instance, who are very backward at present). £10 and a fixed sum for orphans per week would weigh heavily in their favour, and natural deaths being three to one more than accidents, every member's wife would look forward with confidence should  he be called away early; and if my fellow members will take  brothers Boynell and Gibb's case into consideration. I will venture to say an increase of 1d. or more will not cause them to forget whose benefit it is paid for.

In perusing my Review this week I find no mention oft accidents that happened on this line last week (both in one day) the former a ganger who was cut to pieces at a gate crossing between Fay Gate and Horsham; the other a goods guard who, it is supposed, fell out of his brake van (7.40 from Brighton to Battersea goods), now lies at the hospital seriously injured. Another accident happened to the 4.55 Victoria to Portsmouth express on Friday evening between Arundel and Ford. One of the excentrie straps seized, causing the rod to break, and  blocking the road for a considerable time, trains having to be worked over single line and seriously delayed. 

I remain, yours, &c.,
OBSERVER  




RAILWAY REVIEW

20TH OCTOBER 1882

FATAL ACCIDENT TO A BRIGHTON FIREMAN

Robert Webb, a goods fireman, was on Tuesday morning picked up between Wandsworth common and Clapham Junction, by the train leaving London Bridge at 6.20. Webb had fallen off his engine at the spot where he was found while putting a pin into the blower, his own train passing over his arm snd leg. The driver took the train on to its destination, Lillie Bridge, and very strangely appears to have made no effort to ascertain the whereabouts of his fireman until he cam back to Clapham Junction. In the meantime Webb had almost held to death, and died shortly after he was received into St. George's Hospital.



ACCIDENT TO A FIREMEN


In assisting a guard to unload his van at Burgess Hill on the 29th ult., a fireman named Crossfield had one of his fingers crushed.




RAILWAY REVIEW

27TH OCTOBER 1882


The engine of a goods train on the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway ran off the line at Three Bridges Junction on Tuesday morning, and blocked the down line on the Horsham branch for several hours, thus delaying the arrival and departure of the trains between Horsham and Three Bridges. The whole of the traffic between Crawley and Three Bridges was sent on the up line. 




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

3RD NOVEMBER 1882


Efforts continue to be made by a small sectional society, called the Associated Society of Engineers and Firemen, to dispute the enginemen of the country, and to set enginemen against enginemen as well enginemen against all other grades. Having secured to himself a handsome sum of the society's funds in the event of dismissal, some £300 we are informed, the secretary has left the cosy public house he resides in when, at Leeds for a tour to various parts of the country, including Weymouth and Exeter, in the hope of increasing the number of associated engineers, and thereby injuring the Amalgamated society and Old Enginemen and Firemen's Society, and further promoting that discord, disunion, and strife among enginemen which is already too prevalent for their interests. At Exeter some enginemen who once found fivepence per week too much to pay for unity have promised to join this effort at discord at the price of one shilling per week. Time will best prove their promisees, as it will the wisdom of the conduct of these who exacted them. There are Old loves which some should be off with before they are on with the New. Let enginemen be reminded that they owe much to the old Amalgamated Society, that it has never finished from fighting their battles socially, legally, and politically, and that it has won many victories for them. This Associated Society has now existed two years, and has not done one single act in its corporate capacity for enginemen as a body, or indeed for any one else. It collects money and distributes some of it, and so also does every tontine and petty club in any yard or shop, but this is all it does do. We again assert that it has not done one single act worthy to be recorded, while it has toadied to officials -- some of its members have resorted to promote it -- and it has occasioned quarrels among railwaymen. Those who favour men being kept under will, of course, approve this effort at disunion, but as it provides no benefit which was not already offered to every engineman by the Enginemen and Firemen's United Friendly Society and Amalgamated Society, nor proposes to do anything which is not already done by these two societies, we see no reason why enginemen should encourage the Associated Society of Engineers and Firemen for the purpose of weakening two societies which have long and faithfully served them.  




Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.



Wandsworth Common 6th November 1882

THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH NOVEMBER 1882

SERIOUS RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT WANDSWORTH COMMON
ELEVEN PERSONS INJURED


On Monday night a serious accident occurred on the railway near Wandsworth Common station. Although, as far as yet known, the occurrence has not been attended with fatal effects, it has resulted in injury to eleven persons. Shortly before eight o'clock, a London and North western train left New Croydon for Willesden Junction. It consisted of six or seven carriages, and contained a considerable number of passengers. Shortly after leaving Balham station, and while the train was running at the usual rate of speed, a tremendous shock was felt by all the passengers, and the carriages came to a standstill. The collision, it seems, was caused by the locomotive of the London and North Western train running into an engine which was standing on the line to be shunted to a siding. Owing to the state of the weather, the rails were very greasy and slippery, and at the point there is a decline of about one in a hundred, and a sharp curve. It was found that the driver of the train, in addition to his external injuries, was suffering from a serve concussion of the brain. With the assistance of four policemen and an inspector, the wounded man was placed upon a stretcher and conveyed to the Bolingbroke Hospital, Wandsworth Common, where his injuries were attended to by Dr. Hart, the resident medical officer on duty. This was the most severe came, and it is doubtful whether the driver will recover. The force of the collision was so great that the engine which had been standing in the way was converted into almost a complete wreck/ The driver and stoker upon it were also injured, but not so severely as the men who were upon the other locomotive. When the passengers were got out of the carriages, it was found that seven of them were in some degree injured, but none of them so severely as to necessitate their removal to a hospital. The name of the driver who was most severely injured, and now lies at Bolingbroke Hospital, is William Hornby. The stoker who was on the same engine is named Joseph Burns, and resides at 4, York Terrace, Harlesden Green, Willesden. The guard of the train, named William hill, and also residing at Willesden, as injured, but not seriously. The men who were on the engine of the London and North Western train state that the signals were in their favour,  and that there was nothing to indicate to them the fact that any obstacle was in their way.

On inquiry at the Bolingbroke Hospital, Wandsworth, on the following day, it was stated that Hornby was progressing favourably. The stoker and the injured passengers, who are at St. George's Hospital, are also doing well. The cause of the accident is not yet known.


17TH NOVEMBER 1882

All the passengers who were injured in the collision which took place on Monday night between a London and North Western train and the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company's light engine Norwood, have been removed to their homes, and have been found to be not so seriously injured as first reported. The guard of the London and North Wester  trains has gone to home at Willesden and is progressing favourably; but the driver is still lying in the Bolingbroke Hospital, Wandsworth Common, in a rather serious condition. The fireman who was removed to St. George's Hospital, is still improving. Harris, the driver of the light engine, is being treated at his own home. He is in a very critical state, and it is feared that he has sustained internal injuries. The fireman of the Norwood train was seriously injured, and is also lying was seriously injured, and is also lying at home in rather precarious condition.  


24TH NOVEMBER 1882

THE WANDSWORTH ACCIDENT

Sir, Although no official report has been given as to the cause of the above accident, the signalman at Balham has been suspended from duty depending the official inquiry. Like a great many more of his class he is not a member of the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants, or he would now be receiving ten shillings per week during his suspension; and if any of the injuries caused by the accident had proved fatal, and a charge of manslaughter had been preferred against him, the society would have provided him with the best legal assistance that could be procured. Surely then this should be an inducement to all signalmen to join the society, for no man knows how soon he may be in the same position as this man now is, or as he might be should the accident prove fatal.

Yours 
Obediently





THE RAILWAY REVIEW

10TH NOVEMBER 1882

BRIGHTON BRANCH

The monthly meeting of this branch was held at the New England Inn on October 8th. The report of the proceedings has not yet appeared in your columns. It appears from the minutes of that meeting that the secretary was much censured for not seeing that the duly elected delegate had his credential to attend the annual meeting in time to allow him to do so. The other business appears to be the adding of six new members to the branch, and the takings from all sources were over £6. The secretary was absent, and his post was filled by a driver. The meeting on Sunday, November 3, was a well attended one, all the officers, with ehe exception of the chairman, being at their post. After the taking of contributions, and adding two new members to the branch, the minutes of the previous meeting were gone into. The secretary was absent from the previous meeting from causes which were duly explained in a letter to the vice chairman, which was read to the members present. The secretary, in explaining the reasons why one delegate did not attend the annual general meeting, acknowledged that he was to a certain extent to blame for his non attendance, which he very much regrets, as by his attendance at that meeting, our members would have seen his name in several matters that were brought on at that meeting; but the secretary claims that he is not currently to blame for his non attendance. One member who had some illness in his family, and had lost one of his children, was granted £1 from the home management fund to assist him. 

It was stated that the widow of our late brother E. Boynett is in great distress, everything failing that she has undertaken to obtain an honest living. The member who pleaded on her behalf state that she had been to the Board of Guardians, and they had refused her any assistance, and all she had to maintain herself and three children was 5s. per week, which owing to her husband's good sense, she is paid from this branch as allowance from the Orphan Fund. As we had no fund to assist this unfortunate woman from a subscription was started, and the sum of fourteen shillings was in a few minutes collected for her, and taken to her house the same evening, which no doubt she was very thankful for. The taking were good, amounting to £8 13s. 10d. from all sources. most of the members are no doubt aware that at the expiration of this year they have to elect a new secretary. The present secretary has held the office for nearly seven years, and as he is anxious to leave everything clear for the new comer, would like all members to clear the books on the following dates; December 3 and 31. It is not the secretary's intention in giving his post up to leave the society, but will render the incoming secretary every assistance possible. the present secretary, it must be admitted has worked very hard for the branch, but railwaymen at the end cannot, or will not, see the benefits of the society. Of later several instances have come under our notice where no less than six who were formerly members had met with mishaps. As no reports have appeared of late, I trust that this will make up for the past, and that we shall see for the future monthly reports.




THE RAILWAY REVIEW

8TH DECEMBER 1882

BRIGHTON BRANCH

The ordinary meeting was held on Sunday night with a good attendance. The minutes of the last meeting were read and passed, after which a lively discussion was held, Widow Boynett's case citing the greatest interest and sympathy. The Guardians have granted her the usual allowance, and 10s. was subscribed in the room for her. We return thanks to Hartlepool for the interest taken by them in this affair. The warmer discussion during the evening was respecting Brother Best, of Tunbridge Wells, who was suspended (allowance granted him). The facts are: Brother Best and another porter came a few minutes late on duty; after being off a day and a half they were allowed to start at 1 p.m., but would not be paid their time that day. Best refused to start on these conditions; he was told to consider himself discharged. He went to see the General Manager, and asked for an investigation. The chief clerk promised to investigate, and sent an inspector down for that purpose, the result being Brother best was discharged. Out correspondent says it was found out he was a member of our society, and no member of ours must work at the station. The official requires some information; perhaps you will furnish him with the names of those who subscribed to the hours movement, and the collector, so that he may report, and serve them same as Best. The attention of our general secretary is called to this affair. If the general secretary should give him the information required, I pray that in his might he will be merciful to the subscribers and your correspondent.

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