1882

Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


Spa Road 4th February 1882


Bricklayers Arms Junction 4th February 1882


LONDON BRIDGE


4th FEBRUARY 1882

On the 4th February, 1882, in dense fog two, engines Nos. 212 ‘Hartlington’ and 211 
‘Beaconsfield’ were involved in what could have been a really serious affray. The former had left London Bridge with the 4.00 p.m. Brighton express and been followed by five minutes later by No. 211 at the head of the Hastings train. No. 212 had made its way at about 20 m.p.h. towards New Cross, when the fog suddenly thickened and speed was slackened to a walking pace, until just before Bricklayers Arms Junction. There no signals could be seen so speed was reduced even further with both men searched for the fogman. Just as he was found and shouted all was clear, 211 crashed gently into the rear, its speed having been fortuitously lowered by the guard applying his brakes when he failed to sight signals. Both trains stopped, and when it was discovered that the damage was negligible and no one injured, the guards decided to couple the trains together and proceed slowly to the New Cross box. On arrival, the fog had thinned out and each could be despatched separately down the main line. 

AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF RAILWAY SERVANT 

Founded 1871

1913 amalgamated to become the National Union of Railwaymen

In 1872 branches of the A.S.R.S. were formed on the L.B.S.C.R., these branches included Enginemen and railwaymen from all the various railway grades within the L.B.S.C.R.

NEWHAVEN

Date of first members being recorded on the 26th March 1882

Railway accidents on the 


L.B.S.C.R.



London Bridge 19th May 1882

 LONDON BRIDGE


19th MAY 1882

On the 19th May, 1882 engine No. 304 “Nice”, which came into collision with an empty 
carriage truck at London Bridge while running into platform 1 with the 6.20p.m. from 
Tunbridge Wells. The damage to the engine was slight, but the truck shattered and the 
platform edge made unsafe for some twenty-five yards. The Fireman and two passengers 
complained of bruising, while a third passenger claimed compensation for a diamond lost 
from a valuable ring and unnoticed in the confusion. A hurried search the following morning 
by a skeptical inspector of the first-class accommodation surprisingly discovered the missing stone wedged between two cushions.


On the 1st August 1882 the Lewes to East Grinstead line was opened with the Horsted 

Keynes to Haywards Heath opening on the 3rd September 1883.

  Brighton Driver William Love 

is seen standing on the Brighton loco turntable

William Love in 1877 is listed as a Engine driver at the age of 39, was to be the first Engine driver of a B1 class No. 214 Gladstone, which is now preserved in the  N.R.M. at York by the "Stephenson locomotive Society", with his name immortalised in the cabin in the L.B.S.C.R. tradition.
No. 214 Gladstone entered service in 1882 and was withdrawn from service in December 1926, the engine ran 1,346918 


William Love was William Stroudley's (Brighton's Locomotive Superintendent 1870-89) senior driver who accompanied Stroudley 's last prize winner, "B1 class No.189 Edward Blount" to Paris in 1889.

(William Stroudley died whilst attending the Paris Exhibition of 1889)
William Love used to tell the story, that whilst standing by his engine waiting to be signaled to his train, when Stroudley come along and asked: "How is it Love, that you always run through Haywards Heath without taking water?" Love replied "that he always started off with a cold tender." Stroudley paused for a moment, struck his umbrella on the footplate, and exclaimed "Of course, I didn't think of that! You do not expand your water by heating it!” 

It was a custom of drivers to heat their water by knocking the steam back into the tender, consequently they did not start off with so much water owing to it being expanded by heating it. 


extracted from an article by A.G.Ewens 
that appeared in the Southern Railway magazine 
March/April 1942

Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.



Wandsworth Common 6th November 1882

AMALGAMATED SOCIETY OF RAILWAY SERVANT 

Founded 1871

1913 amalgamated to become the National Union of Railwaymen

In 1872 branches of the A.S.R.S. were formed on the L.B.S.C.R., these branches included Enginemen and railwaymen from all the various railway grades within the L.B.S.C.R.

NEWHAVEN

Date of first members being recorded on the 26th March 1882

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