1890

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

 Brighton Driver Henry Lewry & Fireman William Sands

Bill Sands retired in 1932

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL

extracted from RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR


On 4th May, 1890 Belgravia Class, No 206 'Carisbrooke' was working an early morning train to Brighton. The Driver Henry Santer, bore a long-standing grudge against the Station master, and when the train stopped alongside the down platform he slipped across the track to the up side, where several crates of chickens were stacked. Taking one, he entered the first class waiting room and released them, then closing the door he ran for his engine. Unfortunately he slipped on the wet sleepers and broke his collar bone, which brought his movements to the notice of the station staff. When an annoyed traveller complained of having an overcrowded waiting room, the culprit was quickly discovered. Driver Santer was reduced to Fireman, and some months later dismissed the company's service after throwing his coal shovel overboard in a fit if temper following words with his driver. On this occasion his engine was a Class D1 No. 271 'Eridge'


PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL

extracted from RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR

 

LET IT SNOW ......... LET IT SNOW

The winter of 1890-91 contained some of the worse weather on record in the Southern England, and on the night of Monday, 9th March, 1891 much of England was swept by a blizzard but the ‘Night Boat’ was not seriously impeded until south of Merstham. Then much drifting by the high wind caused a 29 minute late arrival at Lewes, while at Southerham Junction the signalman stopped the train and warned the crew that all signals ahead were inoperative. Proceeding at about 15 m.p.h. through deepening snow, a 'Gladstone Class' loco No. 195 ‘Cardew’ struggled on to within a mile of Newhaven Town station and then stuck fast until dug out the following morning. About two hundred yards behind the an old Craven engine 0-6-0 No. 394 with a goods also become embedded, which was just as well as since in such visibility the crew would have had little chance of seeing the guard’s van’s red light.

A 'Craven Standard Goods Loco' no. 211 worked the 2.30 p.m. goods from New Cross to Lewes. It snowed hard all the way, and on reaching Lewes and depositing their train, the crew found to their dismay a special goods of twenty-three wagons and two brake vans awaiting transit to Newhaven. By this time the snow was drifting badly before a westerly gale and most signals were unreliable if not out of action. However a start was made with both men finding such shelter as possible behind the weather board. Little could be seen even at about 10 m.p.h. but despite this steady progress was made until they became embedded up to the chimney base in a deep drift. Realising nothing more could be done, they flung out their fire and retired to the guards van to spend the night. Next morning they were dug out about 9.30 a.m., when they found themselves only some 150 yards behind the Boat express. The gale blew so fiercely that many of the wagons had their tauplins ripped to pieces and the guards van was only kept on the rails by the weight of snow to leeward.

Railway accident on the 


L.B.S.C.R.


Stoat’s Nest 10th December 1890




PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN



Stoat’s Nest 10th December 1890 

Involving New Cross Driver William Muzzle & Fireman George 

Breach & New Cross Driver John Lee & Fireman William Monks 

SEE SUB PAGE


May be an image of 6 people, train and railroad

LONDON VICTORIA c1890s

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