1911


First national railway strike took place, arising from the failure of the 

Conciliation Scheme.

Royal commission set up to examine and report upon the working of 

the Conciliation Scheme.

Average wages of railway workers 25s 9d. per week

Irish Railway Strike.

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 


JANUARY 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


page 17

  

Events that took place from mid November 1910

I also visited our Battersea Branch and saw the secretary on an important matter affecting the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway men, and the following day attended a delegate" meeting in the afternoon, at New Cross, and in the evening a meeting belonging to our 
Westminster Branch. The delegate meeting at New Cross should have consisted of the old delegation mentioned in my last report, but the A.S.R.S. members of that body were conspicuous by their absence on this occasion, although they had been summoned by the corresponding secretary. The tactics throughout this business, by those who have endeavoured to make it a society question rather than the uplifting of the men, have practically nullified the efforts put forth to improve the position, and ought to be a lesson to all locomotive-men on the folly of being in a society which has to resort to such methods to keep the few locomotive-men they have.

I was also able to attend this and on arriving home again found a wire from our Brighton 

Secretary, informing me of a fatal accident had occurred at locomotive shed there, which 

required my attention. Needles to say I lost no time getting on the road again the last 

mentioned places.


I returned home on the Monday 28th, November 1910 and found instructions awaiting 

me from the General Office to attend a Board of Trade, inquiry, at Battersea Park 

Station, on the following morning (Tuesday 29th). I attended to this and had scarcely 

reached home in the evening were I received a post card from our Battersea secretary 

asking me to attend a further Board of Trade inquiry at the locomotive shed on the 

following day (Wednesday 30th). I was also able to attend this and on arriving home 

again found a wire from our Brighton secretary, informing me a fatal accident had 

occurred at the locomotive shed there, which required my attention. Needless to say I 

lost no time in getting on the road again for the last mentioned place.


The inquiry at Battersea Park Station was with regard to a fatal accident to one of the 

men employed on the fixing of pillars, &c, for the electrification of the railway. The 

evidence went to prove that no blame was attached to anyone but the poor fellow 

himself, who, after being warned of the approach of the train, walked away from the 

others with his back to the train, the engine of which struck him in the side, causing 

injuries which proved fatal. 


The inquiry Wednesday 30th, 1910 in the locomotive shed was to ascertain the cause of 

the fatal accident to a man who was working with the joiners employed repairing the 

shed; it seemed he had gone for a piece of timber and on returning, attempted to pass 

between wagons which stood a few feet apart, and while doing so they were closed up, 

pinning him between the buffers. Here, again, this act of indiscretion cost the poor 

fellow his life, but in neither case were our men to blame. The sad case at Brighton 

differed somewhat, inasmuch as an aged driver was the victim. It appears C. Ford

driver, on arriving at the shed, went at once to see the duty sheet to ascertain his working 

for the next day, this being necessary in order that he may turn his engine, or otherwise, 

before booking off; on returning he by some means was knocked down and run over by 

an engine being shunted for proper stabling. It was dark at the time and no one actually 

saw the occurrence, and the only intimation the driver of the engine had was the hearing 

of a groan; he stopped at once, only to find poor Ford had been rolleup under the 

engine and his legs run over, injuries to which he succumbed on the way to the hospital.


I attended the inquest next day (Thursday), December 1st, when the verdict was 

"accidental death," no one in any way being to blame. One sad feature about the case 

was he had done some 40 years in the service and had only a few months longer to work 

before being entitled to superannuation.


LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


FEBRUARY 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


page 75

 

On December 17th 1910, I arranged for, and attended, an open meeting at Brighton. We had 
a nice little company present, and perhaps the secretary will tell us, in the whether it has 
borne fruit or not. Whatever the result may be, I want to tell the London, Brighton and South 
Coast Railway locomotive-men, there is plenty of room for improvement. Our meeting was 
affected in numbers by the fact that members of a deputation were giving a report elsewhere 
of an interview with the powers that be re electrification." This very fact spells weakness, 
and until the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway locomotive-men can rise to the 
occasion by joining their own Society, and move as one body for improved conditions of 
service, the much-desired and deserved improvement is not likely to come their way; a hint is as good as a nod, so I hope the Brighton men understand, and will act accordingly.

 PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

 Eastbourne Semi Roundhouse Loco Shed 1876 - 1911

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

PAGE  83

FEBRUARY 1911

EASTBOURNE  BRANCH

 EASTBOURNE.—Socialist Hall, 95A, Cavendish Place.

First Friday in the month.

An open meeting was held here on Sunday, January 8th, when Mr. W. Warwick addressed a meeting, which was well attended. His address was greatly appreciated and a few questions were put re conciliation boards and Eight Hours Bill. The following resolution was put to the meeting:-

"That in the opinion of this meeting, the time has arrived for all enginemen, firemen and cleaners to become members of the Associated Society, and remain steadfast and true, and by noble brotherhood of societies, build up a gigantic federation, which would benefit all," 

and was carried unanimously. A vote of thanks to Mr. Warwick brought a very successful meeting to a close. Brother C. Broomfield, our branch chairman, presided, and we made one new member. That a few more may be forthcoming is the hope of   

BRANCH SECRETARY.

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN  

The construction of the elevated electrification at Balham


LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


MARCH 1911


Page 112


MONTHLY COMMENTS

 

ON LOCOMOTIVE AND GENERAL RAILWAY MATTERS.

 

By F. W. BREWER.

 

A small batch of new "Atlantics " is also to be put into service on the London, Brighton and 
South Coast Railway. Mr. D. E.Marsh is having these engines fitted with Schmidt super-
heaters, and with 21 in. by 26 in. cylinders. There was some talk that a four-cylinder simple 
"Atlantic " was to.be built. The company propose to run each of the Brighton express trains 
on the hour.
 
The electrification of the main-line between London, Brighton and Eastbourne, is, we 
understand, also under consideration. 

The statement, however, that electrically propelled trains would be running on the main-line 
in about three years' time would appear to be premature. At the recent meeting of shareholders, the Earl of Bessborough stated that the board had naturally thought of 
electrification, and were seeking advice upon the possibility of carrying it out, but the 
conditions of working a mainline traffic would differ very considerably from those obtaining 
in a suburban service, so that much consideration would be necessary before any definite 
decision could be arrived at. 

We might add here that the rumoured electrification of the London, Tilbury and Southend 
Railway seems to be improbable, in view of the proposed purchase of the line by the Midland Company.

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN 

EASTBOURNE LOCO SHED
(L.B.S.C.R. Shed Code E, Southern Railway Code 75G)

Eastbourne Loco seven road shed was opened in 1911 replacing the semi-roundhouse. This 
locomotive steam shed remained until the steam was officially withdrawn on 13th June 1965. 
The steam depot remain opened but now called a Mixed Traction depot. Mixed Traction  
finally closed on the 30th November 1968 

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

STORIES FROM THE SHOVEL


extracted from RTCS book on locomotives of the LBSCR


On the evening of 11th March, 1911, when Driver McKay (New Cross) was in charge of a I3 Class", No. 80, was in charge of the 10.25 p.m. London Bridge - Brighton express ran out of water just South of Burgess Hill. After coming to a stop, Driver McKay was so furious with his Fireman for failing to fill the tanks before leaving New Cross that he threatened him with coal hammer  and was instrumental in the latter  stepping so rapidly off the footplate that he slipped and was severely concussed. Whatever the rights or the wrongs of the matter, both men were later fined and relegated to goods duties.


RAY COOPER COLLECTION

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

APRIL 1911

PAGE 181

BATTERSEA AND NINE ELMS BRANCHES

The members of the above branches had their annual dinner at the Masonic Hall, Stanley's Restaurant, on Monday, March 6th, when a most enjoyable evening was spent. Our organizing secretary, Mr. Warwick, took the chair in the absence of Mr. Fox. The health of the chairman was submitted by Brother P. Turner and was received with musical honours. In reply the chairman said he hoped this dinner would be the means of increasing the members of our Society. Brother T. Higgins then proposed the toast : “Prosperity to the Associated Society of Locomotive Engineers and Firemen." Brother Stevenson, from Slade’s Green, in his response, said he heard the London and South Western railwaymen had made a stir in the right direction and he hoped they would continue to be active. (Hear, hear.) In their grievances the members would always have the assistance of Mr. Fox and the whole of the Executive Council. Brother A. Harrison proposed the toast of the London solicitor: " Mr. A. Tippetts." He said he had that evening received a wire from Mr. Tippetts, and he was sure all that night missed the fam liar face which had been in the chair at previous dinners, and assured them that although Mr. Tippetts was not present in person his mind was undoubtedly with them, and at the request of all present he had sent Mr. Tippetts a telegram wishing him health, wealth, and prosperity. The toast of “The Press” was proposed by Mr. H. Hancock, and amongst those who contributed to the harmony were Brothers F. Symonds, F. Atkinson, A. Philpot, G. Mannell, A.J. Reade, C. Deller, A.F. Densley, W. Suckling, and our old veteran the “Clapham Giant,” otherwise known as “Teddie.” Brother A. Finch gave some tasteful solos on a one stringed violin of his own construction. The programme was brought to a conclusion with the singing of “Auld Lang Syne.”

A.C.H. 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


APRIL 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

Page 166


On Monday 6th Feb, I I got a letter from our Purley Branch secretary, asking me to represent him at an inquest on the following day, as they had unfortunately knocked down and killed a man engaged on the work of electrification near to Clapham Junction. I went to the Battersea Mortuary and got all particulars and attended accordingly the next day (Tues 7th). 

In this case the poor fellow, whilst walking along the line in connection with his duties, appeared to have got 'mystified, by fog and steam hanging about and stood still in the four-foot until he was run down, our men being unable to see him until they were within a few yards of the place where he stood. The usual verdict of " accidental death " was passed, with no blame to the driver. The coroner, during his remarks, gave it as his opinion that " out-of-works," over forty, ought not to be employed on a railway, as they could not at that age adapt themselves to the work.

On the following Friday (10th ) I attended a meeting of London, Brighton and South Coast Railway delegates, at the Thomas a Becket, Old Kent Road, for the purpose of considering the question of the forth coming election to conciliation boards. 

Brother Stevenson attended, representing the Executive Council, and the position was thoroughly gone into and the necessary arrangements made. 


PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


MAY 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

Page 217


On the Monday 6th March I had th honour of presiding at the annual dinner of Nine Elms and Battersea Branches. Mr. Tippets, our London solicitor, and Mr. Fox, both being unable to accept the position, Mr. Tippets owing to illness and Mr. Fox owing to pressure of business. The affair - was all that could be desired.

The following day (Tuesday 7th March) I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at Clapham Junction as to the cause of a fatal accident to a contractor's labourer. Mr. Armytage was the inspecting officer, and when we visited the spot found something to think about when we saw the condition of the bridges where the ppor fellow met his death. At the time of the accident it was some what foggy and steam was coming up through the bridge from a line below. He was among a gang of over 20 which was crossing and another train was passing at the time on the next road, so it was a question of getting off the bridge at either end or getting off on the only side available, and this was covered with point-rods, wires, &c, and not planked over between the girders, so that a man stood a chance of falling through on to the line below ; under the circumstances it is no wonder the poor fellow hesitated until it was too late. To say the least, there are a good many death-traps about our railways yet.

NEWHAVEN ENGINEMEN

IGNITING THE FLAME OF A.S.L.E.F.

On Wednesday 3rd May, 1911, found W. Warwick, A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary at Newhaven, which is about the only locomotive shed on the Brighton line where we have not got a branch of our Society. W. Warwick got to work and  the necessary preparations by way of hall and bills for open meeting on the Sunday 7th May. but on the Friday 12th May he was called away to attend a Board of Trade inquiry at New Cross

W. Warwick returned to Newhaven on Sunday, and at the meeting a few of our members from Brighton and Eastbourne attended, together with Brother Harrison, of Battersea, who preside, but the Newhaven men made a poor show in turning up. However, it was very interesting and this who did attend went away wiser with regard to the position and doing of our Society, and thus, I hope, the first step was taken towards stabbing a branch of our Society at Newhaven. 

THE SECOND SECTION OF ELECTRIFICATION 

TO CRYSTAL PALACE

The electrified line between Victoria and Crystal Palace was brought into use 12th May 1911, and coincided with the visit of King George V to the Palace to open the Festival of Empire to celebrate his Coronation year. 

The full electric service was not inaugurate until the 1st June 1911. At the same time the extension through to Norwood Junction and on towards Selhurst was electrified to give access to the new Selhurst Carriage Sheds and depot. Only a few electric trains working into or out of traffic served Norwood Junction. From Balham to Victoria, the main line was also electrified between Balham and and Clapham Junction in 1911 and the remainder on the 1st June, 1912, this permitting two electric trains to arrive and depart at Victoria simultaneously.    

PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN  

Extract from the Railway Magazine June 1911


The construction of the A.C. Carriage Sheds at Norwood Junction 


 

NEW MOTORMAN’S DEPOTS

Selhurst and Crystal Palace Motorman’s Depot 12th May  1911


PHOTO BY SANKEY

NORWOOD JUNCTION 13th MAY 1911

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

MAY 1911

PAGE 230

PORTSMOUTH BRANCH

It is a long time since you heard from this branch, and no doubt you will think we have been napping, but we are evidently waking up as we have recently made five new members and have great hopes, of more to follow. At our quarterly meeting, held on April 2nd, we had about half of our members present. After the usual business, the report of the Board of Trade inspector on the recent Aisgill Moor disaster was read, and the finding was strongly condemned as most unjust to our fraternity. A tribute was paid to Mr. Fox and his co-workers for their untiring energy on behalf of footplate workers. The chairman, Brother L. Cook, called upon Brother Higgins, chairman of Nine Elms Branch, who had honoured us with a visit, to say a few words. Brother Higgins stated he had been at work all night and wasn’t prepared to come and address us, as it was only by chance he was there at all. Having seen a printed notice of our meeting he thought he would drop in. Nevertheless he gave us a brief  summary of our recent movement and also touched upon Rule 55, medical and eye- sight test and Eight Hours Bill and its Amendments as drawn up by the Executive Council, all of which proved very interesting .A vote of thanks was proposed by Brother Hutton and seconded by Brother R. Stone to Brother Higgins for his very interesting address. Brother Higgins suitably responded, saying he would be only too pleased to come again if ever he had the same opportunity. We also had present Brother Wright, of London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, one of our members and also one of the candidates, and we hope a successful one, for the conciliation board of that company. Trusting you will hear again from this branch in the near future reporting good progress is the wish of 

ONE OF THE MEMBERS. 


Motor coach built for the L.B.S.C.R. for their new overhead 

electrification to Crystal Palace in May 1911

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

MAY 1911

PAGE 231

EASTBOURNE BRANCH

We held our annual cricket match and super on Good Friday, the weather being all that could be desired. The cricket match, married v. single, was a great success and ended in a draw. a good crowd of spectators lined the field, so next year we shall have to think seriously of gate money. The super, to which 53 sat down, was held in our branch meeting room, with Brother Rogers in the chair and Brother F. Taylor in the vice chair. Several ladies were present, and after the company had done  justice to the good things provided the tables were cleared and we settled down to hear a concert, arranged by Brother  H. Marshall, of all "locomotive talent." The branch secretary, on behalf of the committee, thanked all present for their support, and also our locomotive foreman for arranging the men's duty so as to enable them to attend the super. He also gave a brief report of last year's working, pointing out we had enrolled 2,320 members and effected a saving of £8,350 12s. 2d., a statement which was received with applause. A dance brought to a close s most enjoyable day.

BRANCH SECRETARY

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


JUNE 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

Page 270

On the following Sunday (16th April) I met,  by request, the nominees for the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway Conciliation Board, at the club house of our Bricklayers Branch, where important business in connection with the above was transacted and where I received instruction which caused me to put on a 12 hours on the Monday

On the Monday (17th) I attended the morning meeting of our New Cross Branch, at which some important business was dealt with and the branch secretary nominated as one of four for the above-mentioned Conciliation Board (Northern District). This was a kind of bye-nomination, as one of those previously nominated found he would be unable to give the time and attention necessary during the election. 

From New Cross I journeyed to London Bridge and then on to Portsmouth for further important business, which I was able to accomplish with very satisfactory results. I also called upon our secretary there with a view to arranging an open meeting, but have not yet been able to manage the same owing to so many matters forcing themselves to 
the front for settlement.

The following day (Tuesday 18th) I attended an inquest at Battersea, and the result of a poor fellow being run down and killed notwithstanding the fact that he was well-accustomed to the place and work. He failed to get out of the way, although the driver saw him and whistled for some distance before knocking him down. The jury thought it was strange that inasmuch as the driver saw the man did not stop and thus save his life; no doubt this seems feasible and reasonable to the outsider such as most of these juries are composed of, but the practical man knows what happen if a driver of an express, such as this was, attempted to stop every time he saw a man in front of him, especially at the place like Clapham Junction. However, in the end the verdict was “accidental death,” no blame being attached to anyone.

On the Friday (21st April) I attended an open meeting at our Battersea Branch clubroom, which was held for the purpose of nominating candidates for the South-Eastern & Chatham Railway Conciliation Board, and which in the end nominated two of 
our members.

On returning from Shoeburyness I attended a Board of Trade inquiry at  Battersea Park, where a contractor's man had been fatally injured while working on the electrification. Several were working together and had been duly warned by the look-out man of the approaching train ; all stood clear, but by some means, as the train was passing, the deceased stepped back and was caught by the step of the engine, causing injuries from which he died in hospital a few days afterwards. A seemed to have been a case of momentary forgetfulness and no blame was attached to anyone.

The following Wednesday (3rd May) found me at Newhaven, a small locomotive centre on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, about the only one on the Brighton line where we have not got a branch of our Society. I got to work and  the necessary preparations by way of hall and bills for open meeting on the Sunday (7th May), but on the Friday (12th May) was called away to attend a Board of Trade inquiry at New Cross. In this case a wagon examiner had been killed whilst engaged in his duties, but after going thoroughly into the matter it was agreed that our member was in no way to blame.

I returned to Newhaven, and at the meeting a few of our members from Brighton and Eastbourne attended, together with Brother Harrison, of Battersea, who preside, but the Newhaven men made a poor show in turning up. However, it was very interesting and this who did attend went away wiser with regard to the position and doing of our Society, and thus, I hope, the first step was taken towards stabbing a branch of our Society at Newhaven. 

SEAFORD

 POST CARD

 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

JULY 1911

Extracted and adapted from 

A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick’s 

report page 332

The following Wednesday (3rd May) found me at Newhaven, a small locomotive centre on the LondonBrighton and South Coast Railway, about the only one on the Brighton line where we have not got a branch of our Society. I got to work and made the necessary preparations by way of hall and bills for open meeting on the Sunday (7th May), but on the Friday (12th May) was called away to attend a Board of Trade inquiry at New Cross. In this case a wagon examiner had been killed whilst engaged in his duties, but after going thoroughly into the matter it was agreed that our member was in no way to blame. 
I returned to Newhaven, and at the meeting a few of our members from Brighton and Eastbourne attended, together with Brother Harrison, of Battersea, who presided, but the Newhaven men made a poor show in turning up. However, it was very interesting and those who did attend went away wiser with regard to the position and doings of our Society, and thus, I hope, the first step was taken towards establishing a branch of our Society at Newhaven.

 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

HORSHAM

AUGUST 1911

page 377

CONCILIATION BOARD ELECTION

SIR- I beg to tender my heartiest thanks to those who recorded their votes on my behalf as candidate for the Conciliation Board on the Brighton Railway. Although defeated I liken myself to Will Crooks - "I am happy though defeated." I attribute my non-success to a variety of causes, viz:- Not half the locomotive-men recorded their votes, no doubt owing to their disapproval of the scheme; the inclusion of a multiplicity of men off the footplate who exercise their power of the franchise of the all-grade source, a deterrent effect to our likelihood of success; the resignation of our members on the last occasion; being stationed at a rural constituency, lessening the opportunites  of defining my policy for guidance of the electorate; and having written and spoken in condemnatory tones of the conciliation scheme it may have affected or jeopardised my position. No mandate was ever received from the men for the acceptance of the scheme, and my policy always has been to co-operate with the directorate for standardisation and classification of locomotive-men hitherto successful in the past.

Yours Fraternally,

J. Payne


KILLIAN KEANE COLLECTION

Chichester 1 inside Selsry Loco Shed 1911

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


AUGUST 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report

Page 374


During the following week I went to Portsmouth, preparatory to an open meeting, which was held there on Sunday, June 11th. Portsmouth has been at a stands still for some time and it was though with a change of Secretary and branch meeting place, an improvement might be effected, so an open meeting was called as a send-off, and I am pleased to say it did not prove disappointing. Bro Harrison, of Battersea, took the chair, and the attendance was good size of the place. After I had addressed the meeting, an interesting discussion took place re conciliation boards, term of service, &c. Brother Harrison explained the position of the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway locomotive-men up to date. The London and South Western Railway men’s position was also explained the concessions as a result of latest movement, and then, on the call for new members, five came forward and paid their entrance fee. These were all London, Brighton and South Coast Railway locomotive-men, while I don’t think were any “NONS” present belonging to the London and South Western Railway, as these men are very well organised. There is every hope, now that as start has been made with the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, that Portsmouth will soon rank with the best as far as percentages of memberships are concerned.

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

AUGUST 1911

PAGE 380

PORTSMOUTH BRANCH

An open meeting for drivers, firemen and cleaners, was held at the Co-operative Rooms, Gamier Street, on Sunday, June 11th, at which Brother A. E. Harrison, secretary of the Battersea Branch, officiated as chairman. After a few remarks about conciliation boards and the benefits of the Society, he urged all non- members present to join at once. He then called on Mr. Warwick, organizing secretary, to address the meeting, which he did for over an hour to the pleasure of everyone present. His subject was : " The position of locomotive-men and the need for greater unity," and among other things, he quoted the results of the working of conciliation boards, and the concessions that had been obtained from various companies by them, showing how the best times were enjoyed by men who were best organized in their own Society. He pointed out how useless it was for delegates to go before the directors unless they had the men organized and at their backs, as the results were in most cases nil. This showed the need for organization, in order to obtain the best conditions and to retain, them. He spoke of the market value of labour of our fraternity, and the value placed by the arbitrators, who absolutely knew nothing of what our men had to contend with. At the close of his splendid and stirring address, he asked for " nons " to come forward and join, which was responded to by five of them giving in their names, four paying entrance fees. A hearty vote of thanks was proposed by Brother F. Westaway and seconded by Brother P. Wright to Mr. Warwick for his able address, and to Brother Harrison for the able manner in which he had filled the chair. Before the meeting closed a letter was read by Brother F. Giles, our conciliation board member for the London and South Western Railway, in reference to the free pass that had been granted to the pensioners having been extended to their wives. Hoping that we may be able to report further progress is the wish of

ONE WHO WAS THERE 

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

HORSHAM

AUGUST 1911

page 377

CONCILIATION BOARD ELECTION

SIR- I beg to tender my heartiest thanks to those who recorded their votes on my behalf as candidate for the Conciliation Board on the Brighton Railway. Although defeated I liken myself to Will Crooks - "I am happy though defeated." I attribute my non-success to a variety of causes, viz:- Not half the locomotive-men recorded their votes, no doubt owing to their disapproval of the scheme; the inclusion of a multiplicity of men off the footplate who exercise their power of the franchise of the all-grade source, a deterrent effect to our likelihood of success; the resignation of our members on the last occasion; being stationed at a rural constituency, lessening the opportunites  of defining my policy for guidance of the electorate; and having written and spoken in condemnatory tones of the conciliation scheme it may have affected or jeopardised my position. No mandate was ever received from the men for the acceptance of the scheme, and my policy always has been to co-operate with the directorate for standardisation and classification of locomotive-men hitherto successful in the past.

Yours Fraternally,

J. Payne 

O.J. Morris Collection


Brighton 'Trails enginemen' at Littlehampton shed, September 1911, 

with two Atlantic Classes H1 No. 38 ’Portland Bill’ & H2 423 'The Needles.'



LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


SEPTEMBER 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


page 432

 

I had to leave for home the same evening, in order to be able to attend an open meeting 

at Battersea on Monday (17th June) morning, This meeting was called  to deal with the 

new eyesight test lately introduced both by the London, Brighton, and South Coast and 

the South-East and Chatham Railways, the men belonging to the latter being most in 

evidence, for the simple reason, I take it, that the test had been brought into operation 

mostly on that line and several of the men had been taken from the footplate. It is ever so 

with the locomotive-man; he persuades himself that everything is as right as right can 

be, until he sees his comrades tailing around him ; then, and only then, does he wake up 

to a sense of his position and begin to move.

 

Several cases were brought to my notice where men had been taken off, who, for all 

practical purposes, were as good as they were ten years ago, but because they failed at 

the faddist test they had been reduced and degraded. Some had obtained doctors’ 

certificates to the effect that their sight was good, and these were being considered by 

the powers that be. At present it is difficult to see what the result will be, but from what I 

could see and hear, it will depend to a great extent upon how many the companies find 

they can dispose of without running themselves short of men to carry on the work. It was 

whispered that the men were going down in batches, and for the reason above mentioned 

the companies were beginning to stay their hand. 


But what a reflection on the intelligence of our footplate men not to be prepared to deal 

with matters of this description. If organized in their own Society (as it ought to be 

considered a duty and privilege to be) they would have to be consulted before such 

obnoxious things were introduced or made a condition of service, instead of which they 

are simply made battledore and shuttlecocks of between the companies and Board of 

Trade. When the slaughter commences, there is usually a little stir; the officials are 

waited on and they at once assume a serious countenance and say how sorry they are, 

but it's the Board of Trade; an interview is then arranged with that body, which tells us 

its members must be satisfied that the men in charge of our locomotives have proper 

eyesight, but, at the same time, it has not suggested any particular test to the companies; 

and so, men who have spent a lifetime to attain to their position and are rendering 

untold service both to employers and public, are practically being fooled ; nay, worse, 

for their only means of livelihood is being taken away with impunity; and the irony of it 

all is, the very men who are being thus dealt with are standing idly by and trusting to 

blind chance, instead of getting inside their organization which could and would help 

them. And so we are driven to the conclusion the fault is not all with the companies, or 

the Board of Trade, but with ourselves, who refuse to make use of the only means 

whereby we can save ourselves.


I also attended a second meeting on the Tuesday (18th June) evening, at which Mr. Stevenson, E.C. member, was present. At both these meetings the working idea was trotted out by our A.S.R.S. friends, and on the Monday, owing to the indifference of 
our own members, they were able to carry their resolution, which got rescinded on the Tuesday evening owing to the reverse in the attendance, another lesson, if such was needed, of the folly of the present divided condition.

On Wednesday (19th June) I got a wire from our Battersea Branch Secretary informing me an inquest was be held in which one of our members. Was concerned, but was unable to give time or place. I at once "visited St. George’s Hospital to ascertain same, and found it was to be held on the following day, Friday (21st), at the Westminster Coroner's Court. I attended on our member's behalf, who unfortunately had knocked down a man, causing fatal injuries. It was proved conclusively that the fault rested with the poor fellow himself, and although the coroner made very close inquiries as to rules, Sec, he could only recommend the jury to return a verdict of " accidental death.” 

On the Monday (24th) I visited West Croydon, re branch affairs and general internal working, in order to report to Mr. Fox.

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 1911

page 

HORSHAM BRANCH

HORSHAM.—Mission Hall, Barrington Rd., Horsham. 

Third Sunday in the month, 3 p.n.

The following resolution was carried at a Special Meeting held on December 8th:

"That this meeting of the above Branch greatly appreciate the work and arduous task of our worthy E.C. and General Secretary in obtaining the Eight Hour Day for locomotivemen and other grades, and we have the confidence that they will again acquit themselves when the opportunity arises with the standardization of wages."

Branch Chairman, 

Jesse H. Bone,

Branch Secretary,

W. H. Worcester

 

  LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL 

OCTOBER 1911

page 491

HORSHAM BRANCH


An open meeting for drivers, firemen and cleaners was held at the Mission Hall, Barrington Road, on Sunday, September 17th, at which Brother J. Payne, ex-chairman of our branch, was elected to preside. After a few well chosen remarks, he referred to the Conciliation Scheme and recent delegations. He then called on Mr. Warwick, our organizing secretary, who addressed the meeting for over an hour, to the greatest satisfaction of every one present. His subject was " The Conciliation Boards and the recent crisis." I was sorry we had not a larger attendance, but was pleased to see representatives from Brighton, Portsmouth, Littlehampton and Midhurst. After the usual vote of thanks to the chairman and Mr. Warwick, we brought a very pleasant meeting to a close. 

BRANCH SECRETARY

 


PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN  

Balham Intermediate Signal Box

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

NOVEMBER 1911

PAGE 532

 BATTERSEA BRANCH


It is not often a report appears in the Journal from this branch, but that fact does not imply that we are not alive. At a meeting recently held it was decided to have an outing to Brighton, on October 8th, and seeing that business at times can be coupled with pleasure, it was also decided to take advantage of the occasion and hold a meeting there as well. All being arranged, we left Victoria by the 8.50 a.m., in two saloons which our locomotive outdoor superintendent had favoured us with, and arrived at Brighton up to time and in good spirits. We all made our way to the good old seashore and had our photographs taken. Lunch was afterwards served at the Grand Rink Restaurant, and as it is not often we have time, peace and comfort in taking our meals, we all did full justice to the good things provided and thoroughly enjoyed them as well. Having satisfied the inner man, we journeyed to the Drill Hall, Church Street, which we had been granted the use of for the meeting. This was a very successful part of our day's outing, as about 500 were present. After hearing speakers from members of both the Battersea and Brighton Branches, the following resolution was carried unanimously :—

" That this meeting expresses its appreciation at the united and determined stand made by our colleagues in the northern district at the call of their Executive Councils, in August last, against the many and varied grievances under which we have long been suffering, and further desire to assure them that we pledge our support in any action the Joint Executive Council may decide in future.” 

After the usual votes of thanks, this meeting was brought to a close, after two hours and a half, which must have been interesting to everyone, as not one man left before time. Having again refreshed ourselves, We broke up into groups and had a stroll round the town, meeting again at the station to catch the 9.35 p.m., when all expressed themselves as having spent a very enjoyable day in sunny Brighton. The last business we had to conduct before we separated was to say farewell to one of our firemen, who was sailing for Australia the next day. I might mention that we have now to call upon our Executive Council to provide three of their special medallions, which proves that sometimes “ silence is golden,” as in this case 75 new members have been added to our ranks by three of our members.

ONLY A BOY.

 

LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


NOVEMBER 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


page 474


When I returned from the inquiry I found a telegram awaiting me to the effect that a member of our Brighton Branch had met with a serious accident at London Bridge and was lying at Guy’s Hospital. I ay once made my way over and found on inquiries he was doing fairly well and likely to recover.

On the Monday (4th Sept.) I again visited Guy’s Hospital re out Brighton member, after which i attended the commission.

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL

DECEMBER 1911

PAGE 591

PORTSMOUTH BRANCH

An open meeting in ccnnecticn with the above branch was held en November 12th, at the Co-operative Rooms, Fratton Road, when Mr. Warwick, organizing secretary, and Brother S. Higgins, of Nine Elms Branch, attended. Brother Higgins tock the chair and after a few suitable remarks called upon Mr. Warwick to address the meeting, which he did in a very able manner for about 70 minutes, taking for his subject “ The Result of the Strike and the Report of the Royal Commission.” He congratulated the branch upon its increase of 20 members during the quarter. It behoved every railwayman to see he was in his organization and follow the example of the Great Liberal Government, and also take for their motto that of the Naval Gunnery School of this town, which reads :—“ in times of peace prepare for war.” He also illustrated the economy practised by the companies. We had a good insight into the new scheme embodied in the Commissioners’ Report, which evidently seems to be well worth a trial. He urged us to beware of the independent chairman, which was only an arbiter with another name. Reference was also made to Mr. Churchill’s speech at Dundee, regarding: the strike weapon, which we undoubtedly laid aside with the 1907 agreement, but which we had regained and should hold as a birthright. After urging the “ nons “ Higgins,- who referred to the scheme recently put forward en the London and South-Western Railway, but which had since been withdrawn. He regretted the attitude of the members of the Nine Elms Branch during the recent strike, and urged the men, when the next election tock place, to be sure that those nominated were men who could be depended upon, and not these with an eye to self-aggrandizement. Brother Higgins then presented the Executive Council special medallion to Brother P. Wright for proposing 25 new members during this- year. He gave him the good wishes of the Society and hoped he would live long, enough to wear it out. On the call for questions the few asked were answered satisfactorily by Mr. Warwick and Brother Higgins. On a resolution of Secretary, and Brother S. Higgins, of confidence in our Executive Council being proposed and put to the meeting, it was carried unanimously, as was also a hearty- vote of thanks to Mr. Warwick for his most able address and to Brother Higgins for occupying the chair. This brought to an end one of the best and most interesting meetings of locomotive-men it has ever been my pleasure to attend in Portsmouth, and which has resulted in a further increase of five new members. Hoping this will not be the last meeting of this description is the wish of

ONE OF ‘EM

 LOCOMOTIVE JOURNAL


DECEMBER 1911


Extracted and adapted from 


A.S.L.E.F. Organising Secretary W. Warwick's report


page 576


The following Sunday (17th Sept) I attended and address an open meeting at Horsham at which a few of our members from Portsmouth and Brighton were present. I see our Secretary has reported to the Journal so there is no need for me to take up space.

On arriving home I was called to Eastbourne to attend an inquest on behalf of  members of that branch. From the evidence it appears a goods guard had attempted to reach the platform as the train was running in, with the result that he was knocked down, receiving fatal injuries. The jury returned a verdict of  “accidental death."

 The Brighton Enginemen 


that have been identified in the 1911 Census 


NEAL COWDREY


Driver Robert Attridge, was born in Worthing in 1876, and was 35 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 34, Rise Hill Terrace Brighton. 

Driver Edwin Avery, was born in Newhaven in 1865, and was 46 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 24, Somerset Street, Brighton.
 

Driver Alfred Aylwin, was born in Lurgashall Nr Chichester in1859, and was 52 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 73, Princes Crescent, Brighton.

Driver Edwin Drawbridge Beeny, was born in Brighton in 1874, and was 37 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 53, Jersey Street, Brighton.

Driver John Thomas Bassett, was born in Brighton in 1879 and was 32 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 4, Grove Street Brighton.
 

Driver William Henry Beard, was born in Bishopstone in 1861 and was 50 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 6, Holland Street Brighton.
 

Driver George Blaber, was born in Horsted Keynes in 1853 and was 58 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census and lived at 18 New England Road, Brighton.

Bolingbroke Family
Driver William Bolingbroke, was born in Brighton in 1862 and was 49 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived  at 48, Jersey Street, Brighton.

Fireman William Bolingbroke, and lived at 48, Jersey Street, Brighton.

Driver George H. Bolingbroke, and was born in Brighton in 1864 and was 47 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 54, Lewes Road, Brighton.

Driver Thomas Burtenshaw, and was born in Brighton in 1872 and was 39 at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 22 Marshall Road Brighton.
 

Driver Frederick Christmas, was born in Dublin in 1870 and was 41 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 57, Crescent Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Edwin George Christmas, was born in Brighton in 1878 and was 33 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 6, Bembridge Street, Brighton.

Driver Edgar Colwell, was born in Brighton in 1858 and was 53 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 91, Upper Lewes Road, Brighton.
 

Driver James Cox, was born on Brighton in 1861 and was 50 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 30, Bonchurch Road, Brighton.

Driver John Deakin, was born in Milwich, Staffordshire, in 1858 and was 53 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 118 Richmond Road Brighton.

Driver Charles Davis was born in Ratcliffe, London, in 1870 and was 41 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 29, Richmond Buildings, Brighton. 

Driver Frederick Ellis was born in Brighton in 1866 and was 45 years old at the time of the
1911 census, and lived at 37, Belgrave Street, Brighton.
 

Driver Richard Evans was born in Brighton in 1879 and was 32 years old at the time of the 
1911 census and lived at 5, Frederick Gardens, Brighton.
 

Fellingham Family

Driver John William Harrie Fellingham was born in Brighton in 1861 and was  50 years 
old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 27, Claremont Street, Brighton.

Fireman John William Fellingham, lived at 27, Claremont Street, Brighton.

Driver William Field, was born in Clayton in 1877 and was 34 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 24 Viaduct Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Harry Finley, was born in Brighton in 1867 and 44 years old at the time of the 1911 
census, and lived at 10, London Street, Brighton.

Driver Henry Ford, was born in Brighton in 1874, and 37 years old at the time of the 1911 
census, and lived at 81, Bernard Road, Brighton.

Driver Albert Edward Jeal, was born in Rudgewick in 1876 and was 35 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at St Amant, 24, Upper Lewes Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Thomas Godden, was born in Chatham Kent in 1861 and was 50 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 74, Rosehill Terrace Brighton.

Driver Charles John Grainger was born in Brighton in 1871 and was 40 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 45, Park Crescent Terrace Brighton.
 

Driver William Green was born in Brighton in 1876 and was 35 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 41, Brading Road, Brighton. 

Driver Albert Luxford Gunn was born in Brighton in 1874 and was 37 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 117, Bonchurch Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Harry Harrison was born in Brighton in 1873 and was 38 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 15, Terminus Street, Brighton.
  

Driver Thomas William Hatcher was born in Henfield in 1867 and was 44 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 13, Carlyle Street, Brighton. 
 

Hemblade Family
Driver Edward Hemblade was born in St Pancras London in 1861 and was 50 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 65, Hanover Street, Brighton.
  

Fireman Thomas Hemblade lived at 65, Hanover Street.

Driver William James Herriott was born in Brighton in 1863 and was 48 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 35, Elm Grove, Brighton.
  

Driver Frederick Horman was born in Egham in 1871 and was 40 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 41, Brading Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Frederick Ingledew was born in Brighton in 1860 and was 51 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 16, Belton Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Henry Jenner was born in Brighton in 1862 and was 49 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 13, Islingword Road, Brighton.
  

Driver Harry Killick was born in Tonbridge in 1859 and was 52 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 5, Bentham Road, Brighton.
  

Driver Alfred Lander was born in Crawley in 1860 and was 51 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 84, Lincoln Street, Brighton.
  

Driver Samuel Leaney was born in Westmerton Nr Hassocks in 1858 and was 53 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 7, Montreal Road, Brighton.  

Driver Thomas Nicholas Trignwell Leaney was born in Brighton in 1876 and was 35 years 
old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 40, Totland Road, Brighton.
   

Driver Arthur G. Lewry was born in Nuthurst in 1877 and was 34 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 37, Redcross Street, Brighton.  Footplate seniority 9th April, 1894 Transferred to Brighton’s Motormen’s depot in May 1934, joined ASLEF in September 1933, retired in 1946 (needs to be re-check).

Driver William Lewry was born in Brighton in 1882 and was 29 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 14, Grove Street, Brighton.  Footplate seniority 23rd July, 1897 
Transferred to Brighton’s Motormen’s depot in May 1934, joined ASLEF in January 1904, 
retired in 1940 (needs to be re-check).

Driver Henry Mansbridge was born in Bolney in 1861 and was 50 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 61, Buckingham Road, Brighton.
   

Driver Joseph Thomas Mills was born in Brighton in 1876 and was 35 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 37, Guildford Street, Brighton.
  

Driver Harry Mitchell was born in Brighton in 1863 and was 48 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 3, London Street, Brighton. 
 

Driver John William Mockford was born in Brighton in 1864 and was 47 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 86, Whippingham Street, Brighton.
   

Driver Henry George Nailard was born in Brighton in 1874 and was 37 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 42, Hartington Road, Brighton.
   

Driver Alfred Oram was born in Three Bridges in 1863 and was 48 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 80, Elm Grove, Brighton.
   

Driver Charles Pearce was born in Brighton in 1867 and was 44 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 22, Hanover Terrace, Brighton.
 

Driver Alfred George Pelling was born in Poynings in 1858 and was 53 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 7, Guildford Street, Brighton.

Driver Charles Spencer Pont was born in Firle in 1858 and was 53 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 14, Carlyle Street, Elm Grove, Brighton.
 

Driver John William Sands was born in The Resi Nr Lewes in 1868 and was 43 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 23, Crescent Road, Brighton.

Driver Alfred George Smith was born in Newick in 1859 and was 52 years old at the time of 
the 1911 census, and lived at 64, Roundhill Crescent, Brighton.
 

Driver William Lester Starley was born in Bolney in 1869 and was 42 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 43, Princes Road, Brighton. 

Driver William Styles was born in West Hoathley in 1866 and was 45 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 4, Wakefield Road, Brighton. 

Driver George Street was born in Pirbright Surrey in 1852 and was 59 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 75, Cobden Road, Brighton.

Driver John Tapner was born in Brighton in 1867 and was 44 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 5, Camden Terrace, Brighton 

Driver William Tasker was born in Crowborough in 1867 and was 44 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 23, Bentham Road, Brighton.

Driver George Walkden was born in Fulham in 1874 and was 37 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 31, Albion Street, Brighton. Flootplate seniority 1st July, 1892 
Transferred to Brighton’s Motormen’s depot in May 1934, joined ASLEF in March 1925, 
retired in 1938/9. 

Driver James Williams was born in Plymouth in 1875 and was 36 years old at the time of the 1911 census, and lodging at 7,8 & 9, Carlton Hill, Brighton. The address is a lodging house.

Driver John Abraham White was born in Brighton in 1877 and was 34 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 75, Sandown Road, Brighton.
 

The Yeates Family
Retired Driver Robert Yeates was born in Brighton in 1832 and was 79 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 8, Brewer Street, Brighton.
 

Driver Richard Yeates was born in Brighton in 1862 and was 49 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 92, Upper Lewes Road, Brighton. 
* Son Richard is a railway apprentice.
 

Driver John Yeates was born in Brighton in 1865 and was 46 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 8, Hartington Terrace, Brighton.
 

* Son Bertie is a Boiler Maker L.B.S.C.R.

Former Driver Thomas Voke was born in Burwash in 1851 and was 60 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, an inmate at The Workhouse, 250, Elm Grove, Brighton
 
Retired Engines drivers in the 1911 census

Retired Driver Henry Bishop was born in Brighton in 1836 and was 75 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 2 Washington Street, Brighton.
 

Retired Driver George Richard Blanch was born in Chailey in 1839 and was 72 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census and lived at 6, Princes Street Brighton.
 

Retired Driver William Coomber was born in Brighton in 1841 and was 70 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census and lived in the Workhouse, 250 Elm Grove Brighton.
 

Retired Driver Thomas John Cumber was born in Kensington, London, in 1846 and was 65 
years old at the time of the census and lived at 10, Mighell Street Brighton.

Retired Driver Francis Green was born in Brighton in 1833 and was 78 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 22, Park London Street, Brighton.
  

Retired Driver Charles Leggatt was born in Duncton in 1843 and was 68 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 21, Borough Street, Brighton. 
 

Retired Driver George James Nye was born in Pyecombe in 1842 and was 69 years old at 
the time of the 1911 census, and lived at 7, Whitecross Street, Brighton. 

Retired Driver Elias Townshend was born in Ripe in 1839 and was 72 years old at the time 
of the 1911 census, and lived at 147, Queen’s Park Road, Brighton.
 

Driver Alfred White was born in Brighton in 1843 and was 68 years old at the time of the 
1911 census, and lived at 3, Manchester Street, Brighton.
 

Driver John Wilson was born in ? Banffshire Scotland in 1841 and was 70 years old at the 
time of the 1911 census, and lived at 19a, German Place, Brighton. 

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